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Stanwick - Soldiers Notes
Notes from the newspapers concerning Soldiers

Rushden Echo, 23rd March 1917, transcribed by Kay Collins

Wounded—Mrs. Mitchell has received information that her husband, Pte. Percy Mitchell, has been wounded in the head and has lost his right eye. He has been sent to England and is in hospital at Chelsea, where he is making satisfactory progress.

Rushden Echo, 21st May 1915, transcribed by Kay Collins

Stanwick Men – Reported Casualties
It is reported that three Stanwick men were wounded in the great fight on Sunday, May 9th—Pte Herbert Felce, Pte William Felce (brothers), and Pte Craven. Several local soldiers have stated that the brothers Felce were killed, but there is at present no confirmation of either report. Ptes H & W Felce, who enlisted together last December, and together went to the front in March, were members of the Stanwick reading room. Before joining the Army the elder brother had never once slept a night away from home, and the younger one had only spent one night away from home. Inquiries are being made as to their whereabouts, but at present nothing definite had been heard.

Rushden Echo, 27th July 1917, transcribed by Kay Collins

Stanwick - Sergt. W. Watford, Northants Regt., who has just received a third stripe, went through the campaign at Gallipoli, and is now in Egypt. He is the son of Mr. Watford, of Stanwick, who has been a member of the Royal Defence Corps since the outbreak of the war, and whose son George Watford has made the supreme sacrifice. Sergt. Watford was in the Territorials and was mobilised when war broke out.

Rushden Argus, 3rd August 1917, transcribed by Kay Collins

Stanwick Soldier Missing
We are sorry to learn that Pte. William I. Hudson, of the Northants Regt., has been missing since July 10th. His father, Mr. Hudson, of West End, Stanwick, has just received official news.

Rushden Echo, 9th November 1917, transcribed by Kay Collins

Leg AmputatedLance-Corpl. H. Mighall, Labour Battalion, husband of Mrs. Mighall, Bottom End, Stanwick, has been severely wounded, and his right leg has been amputated. Mrs. H. Mighall is living with her sister, Mrs. Tom Craven. Lance-Cpl. Mighall is the second son of Mr. and Mrs. John Mighall, of Thornton Heath, Surrey, and has been in France about 18 months.

The Rushden Echo Friday 3rd May 1918, transcribed by Susan Manton

Men missing
Mr. and Mrs. Hillson have received official notice that their only son, Pte. W. Hillson, Northants Regiment, has been missing since March 26th. Pte. Hillson, who was 25 years of age, joined the Colours on September 1914, and went to France March 1915. He was wounded on May 9th 1915.

Mr. G. Morris, East End, has also received official information that his elder son, Pte. J. G. Morris, aged 28, Essex Regiment, has been missing since March 28th. He joined up on January 29th 1917 and went to France on May 1st 1917.

Mr. S. Morris, of the Avenue, Stanwick has also received official notice that his second son, Pte. C. D. Morris, Essex Regiment, has been missing since March 28th. He joined up on January 24th 1916, and was sent to France on May 1st 1916.

Rushden Echo, 24th May 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Missing—Mr. and Mrs. W. Wise, Bottom-end, have received official news that their son Corpl. P. Wise, Royal West Kents, has been missing since March 11nd. He joined the Colours in 1916, and went to France the same year, being wounded in August 1917. Mr. and Mrs. Wise have two other sons serving their country, one being in Egypt and the other in France. The latter was wounded by a sniper’s bullet during the recent offensive.

Rushden Echo, 24th May 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Stanwick - Prisoner of War—A postcard, bearing the German postmark, has been received from Pte. H. Knight, giving the information that he is a prisoner of war in Germany.

Rushden Echo, 24th May 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Invalided

Mr. and Mrs. Atkins, High-street, Stanwick, have received official notice that their son, Pte. A. R. Atkins, is in Glasgow Hospital suffering from trench fever and bronchitis. Pte. Atkins joined up in Feb. 1916.

Pte. Jim Nichols, aged 38, third son of Mr. and Mrs. Nichols, High-street, Stanwick, and husband of Mrs. J. Nichols, Bottom End, Stanwick, is in hospital at Wrexham, suffering from abscess. He belongs to the Labour Battalion of the R.A.F.

Mrs. W. Hall, East End, Stanwick, has received a letter from her son, Pte. H. Hall, Hertfordshire Regiment, who is in hospital at Bristol severely gassed, with loss of speech and sight for ten days, but is now recovering. Pte. Hall has been wounded once before.

Mr. and Mrs. S. Morris, The Avenue, Stanwick, have received official news that their eldest son, Pte. W. Morris, of the Hertfords, aged 25, is severely gassed, and is now at Stourbridge.

Rushden Echo, 14th June 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoner - Pte. A. W. Chapman, Seaforth Highlanders, M.G.C., has been missing since March 27th. His friends have now heard from him, that he is a prisoner of war but no address is given. His father, Mr S. Chapman, (late of Stanwick) now resides in London. Chapman joined up at the age of 18, in January, 1917, and went to France the following July. He had had no leave since going over. He was educated at Wellington School, and belonged to the O.T.C. there.

Rushden Echo, 8th November 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Shrapnel Wounds received in France have incapacitated Pte. Albert Ellis, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, aged 23, of Stanwick. Pte. Ellis, who joined the Colours on November 4th 1916, prior to which he worked for the British Chrome Tanning Co., Northampton, has seen service in Salonika, Egypt, Palestine, and the Western Front.

Rushden Echo, 20th December 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

CasualtyPte. A W Chapman, Seaforth Highlanders, attached to M.G.C., son of Mr S Chapman (late of Stanwick), is now in Fulham Military Hospital suffering from a poisoned toe and bad ankles. Pte. Chapman was taken prisoner in March this year, and after the Armistice was signed he and others were sent into Belgium and for four days were without any food. They were kept in a Belgian convent hospital before being sent over to England., “After nine months’ starvation and torture, when potato peelings were a luxury, you can guess how much we appreciate the kind welcome and gifts at Dover on our arrival,” so writes Pte. Chapman to Mrs W H Lovell, of Stanwick.

War prisoner’s ExperiencePrivate Harry Knight, youngest son of Mr Andrew Knight, of High-street, Stanwick, who was taken prisoner by the Germans on March 21st, has arrived home. For some considerable time, he told a “Rushden Echo” representative, he was kept behind German lines, then he was sent into German and set to work timber felling. He was badly fed indeed, and if a man would not lift a bit of timber there was either the butt or the bayonet end of the rifle for him. Pte Knight was shifted about all over Germany, and for weeks he had to use his tin hat to eat his food out of, and as knives and forks were not supplied he had to use sticks. All round the treatment was bad. Finally he got to a camp at Gission, and there he and others were fed with Red Cross parcels. He landed at Dover on Dec. 5th., and after a short stay with relatives at Rushden, he arrived at Stanwick on Wednesday week. He is in the Sherwood Foresters.

Rushden Echo, 27th December 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Stanwick - War Prisoners who have arrived home in this district include Pte Dennis Morris, of Stanwick.

Rushden Echo, 20th December 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

War Prisoner’s Experience
Private Harry Knight, youngest son of Mr. Andrew Knight, of High-street, Stanwick, who was taken prisoner by the Germans on March 21st, has arrived home. For some considerable time, he told a “Rushden Echo” representative, he was kept behind the German lines, then he was sent into Germany and set to work timber felling. He was very badly fed indeed, and if a man could not lift a bit of timer there was either the butt or the bayonet end of the rifle for him. Pte. Knight was shifted about all over Germany, and for weeks he had to use his tine hat to eat his food out of, and as knives and forks were not supplied he had to use sticks. All round the treatment was bad. Finally he got to a camp at Gission, and there he and the others were fed with Red Cross parcels. He landed at Dover on Dec. 5th, and after a short stay with relatives at Rushden he arrived at Stanwick on Wednesday week. He is in the Sherwood Foresters.

Rushden Echo, 20th June 1919, transcribed by Kay Collins

HOME—On Sunday three of the territorials, Sergt. W. Watford, Lance-Corpl. F. Wise, and Pte. H. Morris, all of the 1/4th Northants Regt., reached home, and were heartily welcomed by an expectant crowd. The three Territorials were called up in 1914, going overseas on July 28th, 1915, when they went to the Dardanelles. From there they proceeded to Egypt, in which country they had been ever since. They had not been home on leave for four years.


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