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The Succoth Baptist Church
Events

This poster came from a bundle of what we think may have been printers' proofs.
Wellingborough News, 5th January 1878, transcribed by Kay Collins

TEA AND CONCERTOn Wednesday, Dec. 24th, a tea was provided by the members of the Singing Class in connection with the Succoth Baptist Chapel, at which about 59 were present. After tea a very interesting entertainment was given by the Class and friends, conducted by Mr. T. Ellis.
The following is the programme:— "Sigh for false Israel," the Choir; quartette, "Thirsty Land," Misses E. Vorley and E. Ladds, and Messrs. Ellis and Thompson; duet, "Welcome as the cheerful light," Mr. and Miss Ellis; quartette, "Hither they come," the Misses E. Vorley and Ladds, and Messrs. Ellis and Thompson; trio, "The last morsel," Misses N. Vorley and E. Ladds, and Mr. Thompson; recitation, "Curious removal," Mr. B. Vorley; trio, "Daily bread," Misses E. Vorley and K. Tye, and Mr. Thompson; anthem, "I will praise Thee," the Choir; recitation, "The Stork," Master G. Fairey; "Put to the test," the Choir; duet, "Far away," Miss Bull and Miss D. Wrighton; song, 'Thy voice is near," Miss M. Denton; quartette, "God is Love," Miss Bull and Messrs. Thompson and Ellis; recitation, "Coming home," Mr. B. Vorley; anthem, "How beautiful upon the mountains," the Choir. Much credit is due to the Singing Class, all the pieces being rendered in good style, and in a manner which won much commendation. After the usual expenses were paid the balance was presented to Mr. T. Ellis, whose services are rendered gratuitously.
Wellingborough News, March 16th 1878, transcribed by Kay Collins

RUSHDEN - SCENE IN A CHAPEL On Sunday last a distressing scene was witnessed in Succoth Chapel, in this village. For a considerable time past one of the most regular worshippers at that place of worship has been an old lady, named Sarah Odell. She attended Chapel on Sunday last, and during the service was taken so seriously ill that she had to be removed. She never thoroughly recovered, and died on the following Tuesday. The deceased was very much respected.
Wellingborough News, 27th April 1878, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUCCOTH BAPTIST CHAPEL - On Good Friday afternoon, a sermon was preached in the above place by Mr. Isaac Levenshon of London, to a good congregation. A tea was provided in the afternoon, when upwards of 350 sat down. In the evening a lecture was delivered by Mr. Levenshon, on the Jews. The Rev. G. Pung (the pastor) preached on Easter Sunday. Mr. Levenshon preached three sermons to crowded congregations. After the close of each service collections were made in aid of the fund for meeting the expense of warming the chapel with hot water. The total sum realized, including the amount made by the tea, was £19 12s.
Wellingborough News, 11th May 1878, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUCCOTH BAPTIST SUNDAY SCHOOLOn Monday the teachers of this school drank tea together, and subsequently held a meeting, under the presidency of the Rev. G. Pung. The school has been only recently started, and the prospects of success are encouraging. An increase in the number of scholars was reported, and appropriate addresses were delivered by the teachers and friends.

Wellingborough News, 18th May 1878, transcribed by Kay Collins

Succoth Baptist ChapelFor several years past there has been no settled minister at this place of worship. In the early part of the year Mr. Geo. Pung, late of Norwood, came to preach m the place and it soon became evident that his ministry was greatly appreciated in the neighbourhood. A great number of the people here, and in the surrounding district, flocked to hear him preach, and the congregation is increasing, so that the large chapel is generally well filled on Sundays, in the afternoon and evening. In consequence of this, the church gave Mr. Pung a unanimous invitation to settle down amongst them, and to take the pastorate, which invitation, after some consideration, he has accepted. Mr. Pung appears to be a man calculated to exercise a good influence on the community in the locality, because besides being a preacher of some note in the Baptist denomination, he holds very liberal views, politically and socially, and has a powerful way of giving expression to them.

Wellingborough News, 25th May 1878, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUCCOTH BAPTIST CHAPELThe paragraph which we published last week under this heading was sent to the office by an occasional correspondent. Our own correspondent (Mr. C. Groome) has requested that this statement should be made.

Wellingborough News, 15th June 1878, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUCCOTH SUNDAY SCHOOLOn Sunday last special services were held in the Succoth Baptist Chapel, on behalf of the Sunday Schools. In the afternoon a lecture to the scholars was given, and in the evening an address on Sunday School work was delivered by the pastor, the Rev. G. Pung. The chapel was fairly well filled, but no doubt the very unsettled state of the weather, and the frequent heavy showers during the day, caused a falling off in the congregation. At the close of the service the Rev. G. Pung said that up to the present time there had not been a Sunday School in this place, for what reason he did not know, but he thought that every place should have a school, and bear its expense and responsibility. He could not but feel thankful to the Wesleyans and other friends for their valuable help. The school in connection with this chapel was established on the 3rd February with twelve scholars, and now it numbered 65 scholars and 16 teachers. The amount of the collections in the afternoon and evening was £8 12s. It had often been said that the creed of the Particular Baptists cut them off from the sympathy of other denominations, but this was not so as the collection and the numbers of friends from the other places testified; and if at any time he could be of service by giving an address, or otherwise, for any of the other denominations, he should be pleased to render his services. Special hymns by the children, and an anthem by the choir were well rendered under the conductorship of Mr. Ellis.

Wellingborough News, 6th July 1878, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUCCOTH BAPTIST CHAPELThe first Sunday School treat in connection with this chapel took place on Monday, the chapel being elaborately and tastefully decorated. Nearly three hundred persons were entertained to tea, after which the company adjourned to a field lent by Mr. Smith, where amusements of various kinds were indulged in, the enjoyment being increased by the excellent singing of the children, under the able direction of Mr. Ellis.

Wellingborough News, 1st March 1879, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUCCOTH BAPTIST CHAPELOn Feb. 24th, the children and parents connected with the school of the above place met for tea, when about 50 sat down.—In the evening a meeting was held in the schoolroom, presided over by Mr. Pung, pastor of the place, when some very interesting and instructive speeches were delivered by Messrs. S. Knight, jun., J. Ladds, F. Varley, and T. Clarke. The meeting was most encouraging, it being the first one held in this place.—On the Sunday previous, a. special children's service was held in the same building, when prizes in books were distributed to the following : Misses S. and H. Clark, H. Garley, B. Ladds, and W. Desborough, for good attendance and efficiency in lessons during the past year.

Wellingborough News, 29th March 1879, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUCCOTH BAPTIST CHAPELTwo lectures were given in the above place of worship on the evenings of the 20th and 21st inst., by the Rev. J. Wilkins, of Chatteris. The subjects of the lectures were "Babylonian Captivity,'' and "The life and writings of John Bunyan." Each lecture was illustrated by 40 first-class dissolving views, illuminated improved oxygen lime light, which produced a remarkable effect. The proceeds of the lectures were devoted to the Chapel Fund.

Wellingborough News, 19th April 1879, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUCCOTH BAPTIST CHAPEL—On Good Friday a sermon was preached in the above place by the pastor, after which a tea was provided, at which a fair number sat down. In the evening Mr. Pung gave a lecture upon ''Psychology, or the science of the soul, considered in its original shape." The lecture was well attended, and the proceeds were given to the funds.

Wellingborough News, 7th June 1879, transcribed by Kay Collins

BAZAAROn Tuesday and Wednesday last a bazaar was held in the Temperance Hall for the purpose of obtaining funds for the renovation of Succoth Chapel. When the chapel was first built the old seats, which had been previously used, were for economy put down in the new building, and the congregation are now endeavouring to obtain funds for the removal of these old seats, in order to put new ones in their place. This bazaar has been on the tapis for some time, and about six months ago the following ladies formed themselves into a committee for the purpose of making and obtaining articles to aid them in their scheme:— Mrs. Pung, Mrs. Knight, Mrs. Chettle, Mrs. W. Brown, Mrs. Nurrish, Mrs. Baker, Miss Cox, Miss S. Richards, Mrs. Ladds, Miss Crick, Miss L. Chettle, Mrs. Hooper, Mrs. Whitehead, and Miss F. Sykes. The result of these ladies efforts was most satisfactory, and on Tuesday a large quantity of useful articles were offered for sale. The ornamental and showy articles invariably exhibited at these gatherings were conspicuous by their absence. The Hall had been tastefully decorated for the occasion. Scripture texts and mottoes on blue and red grounds, and festoons and wreaths were hung around the room, and had a most pleasing effect. The stalls, five in number, were as follows:—

Working Bee: Mrs. Pung, Mrs. Willmott, Mrs. Nurrish, and Mrs. Baker.

Fairy Land: Miss F. Puug, Miss Crick, Miss Chettle, and Mrs. Nurrish.

Industrial: The Misses Richards.

Crystal Palace: Miss Pung, assisted by the senior members of her Bible Class. The articles on the latter stall were entirely the work of Miss Pung and her assistants, their praiseworthy efforts being deserving of special mention. One feature of the show was the fine art department, which was extensively patronised.

The refreshment stall at the upper end of the room was tastefully laid out and efficiently presided over by Mrs. Chettle and Miss Knight.

The minor arrangements were carried out by a committee of male friends, and the whole of the affair was under the personal management of the Rev. G. Pung, the pastor. The bran pies, not an unusual feature at these gatherings, contributed their share to the funds, thanks to the winning manner of Mrs. Johnstone and the Misses Vorley. During the day Mrs. Bryant and Miss K. Woolston, of Wellingborough, added in no small way to the success of the bazaar by their well known musical abilities. Mr. Dawkins, music master at Uppingham School, kindly presided at the piano. In the afternoon the attendance was somewhat limited, but towards evening the room became inconveniently crowded The financial part of the affair was very satisfactory.

Wellingborough & Kettering News, February 21st, 1880, transcribed by Kay Collins

SERVICE OF SONG—On Tuesday evening, a public tea was provided in Succoth Baptist Chapel, when a good company sat down to tea. In the evening a service of song, entitled "Hezekiah," was given by the choir and friends. The Rev. Mr. Pung gave the connective readings, Mr. T. Ellis conducted, and Mr. J. H. Mantel presided at the harmonium. There was a large audience, and the proceeds are to go towards building schoolrooms.

Wellingborough & Kettering News, April 3rd, 1880, transcribed by Kay Collins

TEA MEETINGS—On Good Friday a tea meeting was held in Succoth Baptist Chapel, and a sermon was preached in the evening by the Rev. Mr. Levesohn, a converted Jew. The chapel was well filled.

On Monday evening the members of the Wesleyan Band of hope had their quarterly tea, in the Temperance Hall. After tea a programme of songs and amusements were indulged in. The health of Mr and Mrs. Denton and family was heartily honoured, and a pleasant evening spent.

Wellingborough & Kettering News, June 19th, 1880, transcribed by Kay Collins

ANNIVERSARY SERVICES—On Sunday last, two sermons were preached in Succoth Baptist Chapel, on behalf of the Sunday School, by the Rev. G. Pung. Special hymns were sung by the choir and scholars. The school, which has only been commenced two years, now numbers 102 scholars, and has a good staff of teachers, and is in capital order. The collections amounted to £8 13s. On Monday, the annual tea was held and attended by between 200 and 300 persons, after which they adjourned to a field, kindly lent by Mr. J. Smith, where all kinds of games were indulged in. The Rushden Temperance Brass Band, ably conducted by Mr. W. Skinner, played a choice selection of music in very good style.

Wellingborough & Kettering News, August 21st, 1880, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUCCOTH BAPTIST CHAPEL was re-opened on Wednesday last. Tea was provided in the Temperance Hall. It is hoped that when the re-opening services are concluded, the building will be free of debt.

Wellingborough & Kettering News, October 9th, 1880, transcribed by Kay Collins

Succoth Chapel—On Saturday evening the teachers and friends attending the above chapel held a tea meeting, when it was decided to commence a Band of Hope in connection with the Chapel. The officers were elected; Mr. B. Vorley was chosen to act as secretary; a code of rules were drawn up and agreed to, and about 50 persons gave in their names as members.

Wellingborough & Kettering News, December 18th, 1880, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUNDAY SCHOOL CENTENARY—On Monday evening last, the scholars and friends attending Succoth Baptist Chapel gave a service of song, entitled, "Footprints on the Sands of Time." The connective readings were read by Mr. T. Newell, one of the deacons. The several pieces were given in a very creditable manner under the conductorship of Mr. T. Ellis. A public tea was provided in the afternoon, and that, as well as the service, was well attended. The proceeds were given to the harmonium and incidental funds of the chapel.

Wellingborough & Kettering News, April 23rd, 1881, transcribed by Kay Collins

Special sermons and tea meetings were held at the Succoth Baptist Chapel on Good Friday. The sermons were preached by the Rev. Mr. Levensohn, a converted Jew. The services were well attended, and more persons attended the tea meeting than could be accommodated at one sitting.

Wellingborough & Kettering News, April 30th, 1881, transcribed by Kay Collins

BAND OF HOPE ENTERTAINMENT—On Saturday evening, the members of the Succoth Band of Hope held their Easter entertainment. About seventy partook of tea, after which the evening was spent very enjoyably.

Wellingborough & Kettering News, May 14th, 1881, transcribed by Kay Collins

CONCERTOn Wednesday evening, the Rushden Choral Society gave the oratorio "Daniel" in Succoth Baptist Chapel, which was kindly lent for the occasion. The solos were rendered by members of the society. There was not a large attendance. The band was assisted by members from the Higham Ferrers Philharmonic Society, Mr. C. Fisher accompanying on the harmonium.

Wellingborough & Kettering News, May 21st, 1881, transcribed by Kay Collins

BAND OF HOPEAccording to arrangement of the Northamptonshire Band of Hope Union, the Higham Ferrers Wesleyan Band of Hope went to Succoth Baptist Chapel on Wednesday evening, and gave a good entertainment to the Band of Hope of that place. The following took part in the proceedings: Mr. S. Pack (presiding) J. Partridge, W. Rogers, W. Patenall, C. Horrell, C. Payne, A. Middleton, and Misses M. A. Partridge, M. Groome, S. and E. Black wells, L. Horrell, M. Clements, and E. Woodhouse.

Wellingborough & Kettering News, June 11th, 1881, transcribed by Kay Collins

Succoth School Sermons—On Sunday last, two sermons were preached in the above place of worship by the Rev. Mr. Hunt Lynn, of London, to very good congregations. In the afternoon, the rev. gentleman gave an address to the scholars. Special hymns were sung by the scholars and choir, the latter being assisted at evening service by members of the Old Baptist, Wesleyan, and the Independent Wesleyan choirs. In addition to the special hymns, which had been carefully rehearsed under Mr. Ellis for the occasion, the service in the morning was varied by an anthem, "Remember now thy Creator," and in the evening they sang "Gloria" from Mozart's "12th Mass”. The collections amounted to £8 4s. 11d. The school has only been established three-and-a-half years, but has in regular attendance 108 scholars.—On Monday, the scholars partook of tea in the Temperance Hall, which was well filled with the friends of the school. After tea, all retired to a field, kindly lent by Mr. J. Smith, where all kinds of outdoor games were indulged in. The Temperance Brass Band, under the leadership of Mr. W. Skinner, being present, discoursed a choice selection of sacred choruses, &c.

Wellingborough & Kettering News, July 2nd, 1881, transcribed by Kay Collins

THE SUCCOTH CHAPEL BIBLE CLASS had their last meeting for the season on Thursday, and partook of tea in the schoolroom. After tea, addresses were given by members of the class, and Mr. Pung, as the president, was presented with a new black coat by Mr. Newell. The remainder of the evening was spent in singing, &c.

Wellingborough & Kettering News, August 6th, 1881, transcribed by Kay Collins

ANNIVERSARY SERVICESOn Sunday last the school sermons were preached in the Old Baptist Chapel. The Rev. Mr. Oates, of Northampton, was expected to preach, but in consequence of serious family affliction he could not attend, and the sermons were preached by the Rev. W. A. Davis, the pastor. In consequence of the heavy downpour there were not many present in the morning, but in the evening the chapel was crowded. The collections for the day amounted to £17 9s. On Monday the annual tea feast was held, when there was a very large gathering of the friends, more than three hundred sitting down to the public tea. The usual games were afterwards played, and a very successful evening was spent.—On Monday the anniversary of the re-opening of Succoth Baptist Chapel was celebrated. Two sermons were preached by the Rev. Hunt Lynn. A public tea was held, when the attendance far exceeded expectation. The proceeds were devoted to reducing the debt incurred in renovating the chapel, &c., and after the services on Monday there was only a debt of £17 left on the chapel and society.

Wellingborough & Kettering News, October 1st, 1881, transcribed by Kay Collins

SPECIAL SERVICESSpecial sermons were preached on Sunday at the Old Baptist Chapel and at Succoth, at which places collections were made for the funds of the societies.

Wellingborough & Kettering News, October 29th, 1881, transcribed by Kay Collins

BAND OF HOPE VISIT—On Wednesday evening last, according to the Temperance Union plan, the Higham Ferrers Wesleyan Band of Hope visited the Succoth Baptist Chapel, Rushden. Mr. S. Pack presided. After singing and prayer, glees were sung by Messrs. Smith, Middleton, and Groome, and the Misses E. and S. Black well, L. Horrell, and M. Groome; dialogues were given by Mr. C. Horrell, Mr. W. Whitbread, Miss M. A. Partridge, and Miss A. Parker; and recitations as follows: Mr. C. Horrell, "The Frenchman and the rats"; Mr. O. Patenall, "The Inchcape Bell"; Miss A. Parker, "Don't go in to-night, John"; Miss M. A. Partridge, "Will my boy be lonely there"; Miss S. Blackwell, "The drunkard's last scene"; Minnie Groome, "The drunkard's wife." The usual votes of thanks closed a very successful meeting.

Wellingborough & Kettering News, November 12th, 1881, transcribed by Kay Collins

RUSHDEN—CONCERTOn Wednesday evening, the 2nd inst., a concert, with readings, &c., was given in the Temperance Hall, by the choir of Succoth Baptist Chapel, assisted by a few friends. The object of the concert was to aid in the liquidation of the debt on the harmonium in that chapel. Mrs. B. A. Fisher presided at the piano, and Master G. Farey at the harmonium; Mr. T. Ellis conducted the choruses. The programme was a very creditable one. Mr. Skinner sang the solo, "Now heaven in fullest glory," exceedingly well; Mr. Farey did justice to "He layeth the beams," and Mrs. Bull was encored for the able way in which she sang, "No night there." But the chief feature of the evening was the scenes from gipsy life, the characters being well sustained by the two Misses Pung. There was not a large attendance, in consequence of counter attractions. The following was the programme:— Chorus, "Swell the full chorus" (Solomon); solo, "Now heaven in fullest glory" (Creation); Mr. Wm. Skinner; trio, "O lady fair" Miss Wilby, Mr. C. Stringer, and Mr. J. Farey; song, "No night there," Mrs. Bull; reading, "An unlucky side;" Mr. G. H. Groome; semi-chorus, "Welcome as the cheerful light;" recit, "He measureth the water in his hand," and solo, "He layeth the beams" (Israel in Egypt), Mr. J. Farey; chorus, "Happy, happy, happy pair" (Alexander's Feast); two scenes from gipsy life, original, Misses K. and F. Pung; glee, "May Day;" solo, "Love sounds the alarm" (Acia and Galatea), Mr. C. Stringer; duet, "The voice of the ocean wave," Mrs. Bull and Miss E. Denton; trio, "Breathe soft ye winds," Miss E. Ellis, Miss C. Button, and Mr. J. Farey; semi-chorus, "Bright moonlight sea;" glee, "All among the barley."

Wellingborough & Kettering News, December 17th, 1881, transcribed by Kay Collins

Entertainment—On Wednesday evening last an entertainment was given in the Succoth Chapel senior members of the Old Baptist Meeting Band of Hope. Mr. S. Harris presided, and an excellent programme was gone through in which the following ladies and gentlemen took part: Miss ... Bayes, Miss S. J. Knight, Miss Nelly Billingham, Miss Chettle, Miss E. Denton, the Misses ..., Miss Lizzie Knight, Miss Miriam Knight, Miss M. Harris, Master Willie Sargent, Master W. Partridge, Mr. David Crick, Mr. Fred. Cowley, Mr. ... Darlow, Mr. R. Savage, Mr. W. Skinner, and Mr. Thos. Everard. At the close a vote of thanks was given. Miss Fisher presided at the harmonium, and the attendance was fair.

Wellingborough News, 4th March 1882, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUCCOTH CHAPEL—On Monday last a very substantial tea was provided in the above place for the parents of the Sunday scholars in connection with the above place of worship. The teachers connected with the above school also partook of tea and altogether a very good number sat down. Tea being over a very interesting meeting was held, presided over by the Rev. G. Pung, who gave an instructive address. Speeches were also given by some of the teachers. Some special anthems ware sung at intervals by the choir and a very pleasant evening was spent.

Wellingborough News, 13th May 1882, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUCCOTH CHAPEL—On Monday afternoon last the members of the Bible class in connection with the above place of worship met at the class-room adjoining the chapel to close the class for the present season. The members and friends partook of a very substantial tea, after which a meeting was held, when addresses were given by the president (Rev. G. Pung), and various members of the class. At the meeting it was suggested by the members of the class to present the president with a copy of Dr. Kitto's Bible, as a token of respect for the valuable assistance he had rendered throughout the season. Some special anthems were then sung. The attendance was numerous and appreciative.

Wellingborough News, 3rd June 1882, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUCCOTH ANNIVERSARY—On Sunday two sermons were preached in the Succoth Baptist Chapel, by the Rev. Mr. Silverton, of London. The chapel was crowded. On Monday a public tea was provided in the schoolrooms, at which there was a good company, and in the evening a public meeting was held in the chapel, when addresses were delivered by the Revs. G. Pung, Silverton, W. A. Davies, and others. The services were well attended, and the collections were for the pastor's fund.

Wellingborough News, 23rd September 1882, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUCCOTH BAND OF HOPE—The general annual meeting of the society was held on Thursday, the 14th inst., when the report of the work, &c., done by the society was read by the secretary, and the following were appointed officers for the ensuing year:—President, Mr. F. Vorley; vice-president, Mr. T. Baker; general secretary, Mr. B. Vorley; financial secretary, Mr. A. Eden; treasurer, Miss K. Tye; conductor of singing, Mr. J. Ellis; collectors, the Misses N. Vorley and B. Fisher; committee, Misses E. Crick, M. A. Vorley, L. Clark, W. Desborough, F. J. Margetts, &c. Arrangements were made for the winter months and suggestions offered for the improvement of the band. The meeting closed in the usual way.

Wellingborough News, 7th October 1882, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUCCOTH BAND OF HOPE—On Wednesday evening, the Band of Hope, in connection with the Succoth Chapel held their first meeting of the season, when the chair was occupied by Mr. F. Vorley. The following took part in a well-rendered programme:—Miss Keziah Tye, Miss A. Vorley, Messrs. B. Vorley, J. Ellis, and Master John Sayer. Miss B. Fisher presided at the harmonium, and at the close of the meeting was presented with a very nicely-bound copy of hymns by the senior members of the Band of Hope as an acknowledgment of her assistance at the meetings.

Wellingborough News, 21st October 1882, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUCCOTH CHAPEL—In accordance with the Sunday School Union programme, special services on behalf of the young were held in the above place of worship on Sunday last. The morning service was devoted to a harvest thanksgiving, and in the evening to the Sunday school. It being a day of universal prayer, in the evening a very interesting address was made by the pastor, and nine senior scholars were presented with Bibles. The pastor's address had a special reference to Sunday school work, as had the special hymns and anthem nicely sung by the choir.

Wellingborough News, 23rd December 1882, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUCCOTH BAND OF HOPE—On Wednesday evening last, the above society held a meeting, when the chair was taken by Mr. F. Vorley. Miss Fisher presided at the harmonium. The attendance was very good. The following took part in a well rendered programme:—B. Dickens, B. Vorley, H. Dickens, B. Ladds, A. Baker, N. Abbott, A. Dickens, E. Ellis, E. Margetts, and L. Desborough.

Wellingborough News, 30th December 1882, transcribed by Kay Collins

TEAS AND ENTERTAINMENTS—On Wednesday a public tea was held at the Succoth Baptist Chapel. The proceeds will be devoted to the debt on the society.—On the same day a tea and entertainment was given by the Old Baptist Temperance Society to the members of their Band of Hope.

SUCCOTH BAND OF HOPE—The tea and entertainment (briefly reported in another column) which took place on Tuesday, proved very successful. At 3.30 the junior members partook of tea in the Schoolroom, and an hour later an excellent tea was provided for the senior members and friends. At 5.30 there were special attractions in the email room, consisting of steam models, magnetic battery, musical box, &c., all in motion, which highly delighted the young folks. At six o'clock games of various kinds were indulged in till 6.30. An entertainment was then held under the presidency of Mr. F. Vorley, when the following programme was gone through in capital style:—Opening hymn; address by the Chairman; recitation, Miss K. Clarke; recitation, Mr. Vicars; hymn; recitation, Miss Annie Vorley; recitation, Miss Annie Wilmott; hymn; recitations, by Mr. W. Patenall and Miss Naomi Vorley; an Irish address, by Mr. W. Patenall; hymn; dialogue, by the Misses Vorley, Ellen Jacques, Eliza Denton, Elizabeth Crick, and Lizzie Chettle; hymn. This was followed by a spelling bee on a small scale, open to the junior members of the Band of Hope only, when three prizes were awarded to the successful competitors, namely, 1 John Sayer, 2 Herbert Dickens, 3 Louisa Desborough. Afterwards a card was presented to every junior member who had attended four meetings during the season. An orange was also presented to all the junior members on their leaving the room. The room was very nicely decorated for the occasion.

Wellingborough News, 2nd February 1884, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUCCOTH BAND OF HOPE—On Wednesday evening, the 23rd inst., the ordinary meeting of the above was improved by Mr. A. Marchant, who addressed the society on "The House we live in," illustrated by the Band of Hope Union District new set of physiological diagrams. At the close a hearty votes of thanks was accorded him for his address. Mr. F. Vorley presided, and spoke of the benefits of being connected with the Union, and he hoped all the societies in the Union would make use of the diagrams, as they must prove a means of much instruction. Miss Polly Ekins presided at the harmonium.

From Wellingborough & Kettering News 18/01/1889, transcribed by Peter Brown

Succoth Chapel—On Tuesday, Mr. I. Levinsohn (of the British Society for the proposition of the Gospel among the Jews), delivered a lecture upon “The Jews” in the above place of worship. The lecture was preceded by a tea which was well attended, the evening meeting being presided over by the Rev. W. J. Pointing. The lecturer who gave an interesting sketch of his visit to Jerusalem, further added to the interest of the evening by the exhibition of the various accessories used in the Jewish Synagogues, and by attiring himself in the various costumes adopted by the Jewish ritual. The proceeds were given to the above society.

The Northampton Mercury, 16th February 1889, transcribed by Kay Collins

Succoth Baptist Chapel—The annual distribution of prizes for regular attendance during last year took place on Sunday, when a suitable address was given by Mr Smith, of Fenny Stratford. On Monday the annual tea and meeting took place, the meeting being presided over by Mr J Lards.—The Secretary, Mr B Vorley, presented the 10th report which showed a growing of the school and contained an interesting account of the year’s work.—Mrs T Eady (Treasurer) read the cash accounts, which shewed a balance of £1 2s. 6d. in hand. A statement of the school building accounts show enough to meet all demands, and nearly £5 balance, which was devoted to purchasing all new seats for the large room, with reversible backs to form classes.—The election of officers resulted as follows:- Superintendents, Messrs J Ladds and F Vorley; secretary, Mr B Vorley; treasurer, Mrs Eady; assistant secretary, Mr F B Ladds.—During the evening Mr T Eady presented Mr J Shortland with a sum of money, in a few well-chosen remarks, for his untiring services as accompanist in public services.

The Argus, 11th April 1890, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUCCOTH CHAPEL—On Easter Monday a tea was held in the schoolroom, to which a large number sat down. After the tea a meeting was held and presided over by Mr. W. E. Palmer (pastor) addresses being also given by Mr. F. King (of Carlton) and Mr. J. B. Warren (Irthlingboro') the attendance at this also being good.

Wellingborough News, 3rd October 1890, transcribed by Kay Collins

TEACHERS' OUTING—On Saturday last the teachers of Succoth Sunday School, with a number of friends, visited the residence of Mr. W. Brown, Hinwick Woods, and spent a most enjoyable afternoon by rambling through the woods and ridings. A capital tea was served by Mrs. Brown in the riding near the house, and at dusk the Rev. W. E. Palmer proposed a hearty vote of thanks to Mr. and Mrs. Brown for their kindness. In reply Mr. Brown hoped each might live to pay him another visit in the future.

Wellingborough News, 12th February 1892, transcribed by Kay Collins

SUCCOTH SUNDAY SCHOOL —PRESENTATION OF PRIZES AND ANNUAL MEETING
On Sunday afternoon a special service was held for the Presentation of prizes to scholars for regular attendance during 1891. An address was given by Rev. W. E. Palmer, who afterwards handed the awards to the scholars, which numbered about 40.—On Monday the annual teachers tea and meeting was held, the meeting being presided over by Mr. Palmer, and was fairly well attended.—The treasurer's report showed a balance in hand of £2 1s. 4½d., and the secretary's report dealt with the years work of the school, and was unanimously adopted.—The school anniversary was fixed for June 19th.—The following were elected officers for the year: President, Rev. W. E. Palmer; superintendents, Messrs. F. Vorley and J. Ladds; treasurer, Mr. T. Eady; secretary, Mr. B. Vorley; assistant secretary, Mr. B. Ladds; foreign mission secretary, Mr. W. Lack, who also read a report of the accounts of that society. Other matters of school interest were summarily dealt with, as well as visitors for absent scholars.

Rushden Echo and Argus, 4th February 1898, transcribed by Kay Collins

Lantern Lecture-At Succoth Baptist Chapel on Tuesday evening a lecture was given by Mr. J. Cook, entitled “The History of the struggle of Religious Liberty” and was much enjoyed. The lecture was illustrated by 60 lantern slides shown by Mr. B. Vorley’s powerful lantern. A collection was taken in aid of the Band of Hope fund.

The Rushden Echo, 24th June 1898, transcribed by Kay Collins

The 21st Anniversary of the Succoth Baptist Sunday school was celebrated on Sunday when suitable sermons were preached morning and evening by the pastor, Mr. J. Crook, a special children's service was held in the afternoon, when Mr. Crook gave an address to the scholars and friends, and recitations were given by the following children: Naomi Whiteman, Mary Hobbs, Laurie Bennett, Walter Brown, E. Hale, Leonard Bennett, Edgar Baker, Chas. Burridge, Cyril Desborough, and William Brown. Special hymns were sung by the children. There were good congregations, especially in the evening, when the chapel was crowded. The collections, for the school realized £11 10s. On Monday the children had their annual treat. They were regaled with tea in the afternoon, and afterwards an adjournment was made to Mr. G. Denton's field where a happy time was spent. Tea was also served to a number of the parents and friends. Mr. L. Newell is the superintendent of the school which is in a flourishing condition. During the year there has been an increase of about 30 in the number of scholars. The following presided over the tea tables: Mrs. Hale, Mrs. Reynolds, Mrs. Giles, Misses P. Bates, E. Hobbs, Mrs. Boyle, Mrs. Sanders, Mrs. Baker, Mrs. F. White, Mrs. Dickens, Mr. Underwood and Miss Ensom.



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