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Rushden Echo, 8th February 1918

Mr. Horace Brawn

An accident occurred at the bottom of Rushden Hill on Sunday at about 8 p.m. to Mr. Horace Brawn, of Victoria-road, who has since been confined to his bed suffering from shock and severe bruises.  It appears that Mr. Brawn, who was accompanied by Mr. Harry Tye, was walking home from Higham Ferrers, and had just reached the bottom of Rushden Hill when he and his companion noticed a motor 'bus approaching them from the direction of Rushden.  They had just commenced to move to the left of the road to avoid the motor 'bus when they heard the sound of a motor horn just behind them, and immediately afterwards Mr. Brawn who was the nearest to the side of the road, was struck by the bonnet of a car, which belonged to the Mayor of Higham Ferrers (Ald. T. Patenall) and thrown to the ground, but fortunately clear of the wheels.  It was owing to the pitch darkness of the night and his reduced head-lights that the chauffeur did not notice the pedestrians in front of him until practically on top of them, and was therefore unable to avoid the accident.  Fortunately, he was only travelling at a slow speed, and was therefore enabled to pull up smartly, so that the car did not pass completely over Mr. Brawn.  Mr. Brawn, whose clothes were plentifully bespattered with mud, was picked up and conveyed in the car to the bottom of Victoria-road, from which point he was able to walk to his residence.  Dr. Baker, who was called in, fortunately found that Mr. Brawn was suffering from nothing more serious than shock and severe bruises, no bones being broken.  Mr. Tye is to be congratulated upon his escape, as had he attempted on hearing the hooter to move more towards the left of the road he must inevitably have also been involved in the accident.  Inquiries on Monday elicited the information that Mr. Brawn, although confined to his bed, was progressing as well as could be expected.



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