Click here to return to the main site entry page
Click here to return to the previous page
The Rushden Echo, 14th April, transcribed by Jim Hollis
Rushden Urban District Council

Support for The Peace Movement

Tip-Cat in the Streets

A meeting of this Council was held on Wednesday night, when there were present : Mr. F. Knight (chairman), J. Claridge (vice-chairman), the Ven. A. Kitchin, Messrs. G. Miller, F. Ballard, C. E. Bayes, J. S. Clipson, T. Swindall, C. Bates, J. Spencer, and W. Bazeley, with the Clerk (Mr. G. S. Mason), the Surveyor (Mr. W. B. Madin), and the Sanitary Inspector (Mr. Allen).

Welcome

The Chairman, in view of the fact that that was the first meeting attended by the new Sanitary Inspector, gave the officer a very cordial welcome on behalf of the Council, and expressed the hope that his stay in the town would be beneficial to himself and the town.

The Sanitary Inspector thanked the Chairman and the Council and said he would do his best to satisfy their requirements.

Plans, Etc., Committee

A meeting of the Plans, Highways, and Lighting Committee was held at the Council Buildings on Wednesday, the 29th March, 1911, when there were present :- Messrs. F. Knight (chairman), J. Claridge, J. S. Clipson, F. Ballard, C. E. Bayes, and G. Miller.

Plans

were presented by:-

Mr. Walter Knight for printer’s workshop at the rear of No. 29 Oswald-road, and passed subject to a damp course being provided in the existing fence wall.

The Northants Union Bank for additions to No. 88 High-street, and passed.

Mr. T. Wilmott for lock-up shop in Robinson-road and passed.

Messrs. Chapman and Co., Ltd., for open shed at the rear of their factory in Cromwell-road and no exception taken.

Mr. A. Franklin (amended plan) for electric theatre opposite the Victoria Hotel and passed.

Infringement of Bye-Laws

The Surveyor reported that Mr. Wm. Packwood had seriously infringed the Bye-laws with regard to air space in the erection of a house in Trafford-road not in accordance with the plans as passed by the Council. It was resolved that the Committee meet on the site at 11 o’clock on Friday morning.

The Committee met on the site on Friday morning and accepted the suggestion made by Mr. Packwood for an alteration to the fence at the rear of the house so as to give a minimum average distance of 16 feet 6 inches across the open space at the rear. Mr. Packwood undertook to submit an amended plan showing the alterations.

Main Roads

The Surveyor reported that he had met the County Surveyor and agreed with him upon an estimate of £1,020 per annum for the maintenance of the main roads for the ensuing five years. The Clerk submitted a letter from the Clerk to County Council stating that that Council had approved of a recommendation of their Roads and Bridges Committee that the term of contracts for the maintenance of the main roads should be extended from three to five years and had resolved that an agreement be entered into with this Council for the maintenance of the main roads in the Urban District of Rushden for the five years ending the 31st March, 1916, at the sum of £1,020 per annum.

The Committee resolved to recommend the Council to enter into an agreement on these terms.

A further letter from the Clerk to the County Council was received stating that that Council had considered estimates for tar binding and surface tarring on the main roads in this district and subject to a grant being obtained from the Road Board and to the work being completed to the satisfaction of the County surveyor, agreed to pay to this Council the sum of £239/7/6 for this purpose, subject also to the council expending £35/12/6 on the same work.

Road Materials

The Surveyor was instructed to write to the firms who tendered last year inviting them to again send in tenders for the ensuing year’s supply of road materials.

Motor Danger Signals

A letter was received from the Clerk to the County Council stating that this Council’s application for the erection of motor caution notices had been submitted to the Roads and Bridges Committee, who were of opinion that notices at the places indicated in the application were unnecessary and that they were unable to accede thereto.

The application referred to was made on the report of the Northants Automobile Association and at the suggestion of the Royal Automobile Association. The Committee having brought the matter before the County Council, whose duty it is to erect caution notices where required, did not feel under any obligation to proceed further with the matter, the responsibility being entirely with the County Council.

Field Footpaths

The Surveyor was instructed to repair the field footpath leading from Cromwell-road towards Chelveston as far as the entrance to the second allotment field.

Tip-Cat

Attention was called to the serious nuisance and annoyance to passengers caused by the playing of this game in the streets, and it was resolved to recommend the Council to make representations to the police authorities with a view to proceedings being instituted against offenders.

Spencer Road

It was resolved to recommend the Council to at once declare this road a public highway repairable by the inhabitants at large.

Council Buildings

The Surveyor was instructed to purchase a Union Jack for use at the Council Buildings.

Mr. Spencer moved that the recommendation regarding tip-cat be referred back to the committee for further consideration. The children had nowhere to play and until they had he was opposed to any resolution empowering a prosecution. He thought roller-skating and throwing orange-peel on the pavement were equally dangerous practices, and that it would be a downright shame to adopt the committee’s recommendation as long as the children had no recreation ground.

Mr. Bazeley seconded the motion to refer the matter back.

Mr. Ballard supported the committee’s recommendation. He much regretted they had not adequate playgrounds, but the game complained of was very dangerous.

Mr. Spencer : Not half so dangerous as motor cars coming through the streets.

Mr. Ballard : That is another thing.

The committee’s recommendation was adopted as was also their report as a whole.

Finance and Estates Committee

A meeting of the Finance and Estates Committee was held at the Council Buildings, on Tuesday, the 4th April, 1911, at 10 a.m., when there were present :- Messrs. F. Knight (chairman), J. Claridge, F. Ballard, W. Bazeley, and T. Swindall.

Surveyor’s Cash Account

The Committee examined the Surveyor’s cash account with the wages books, the expenditure shown therein being as follows:-


£

s

d

Week ending 2nd March, 1911

32

17

10

Week ending 9th March, 1911

32

16

4

Week ending 16th March, 1911

32

15

2

Week ending 23rd March, 1911

32

3

0

Week ending 30th March, 1911

34

5

0

Collector’s Accounts

The Committee examined the Collector’s accounts, from which it appeared that the following sums had been collected since the last meeting:-


£

s

d

General District Rate

430

1

1

Fittings

112

0

1

Cemetery fees

12

5

6

Green tolls


15

0

Treasurer’s Accounts

The Treasurer’s accounts were also examined from which it appeared that he had received the following sums since the last meeting:-

 

£

s

d

Free Library, Fees, fines, etc

2

14

0

Clerk, Sandpit-road

65

0

0

Clerk, Licences

2

5

0

Collector, District rate

430

1

1

Collector, Fittings

112

0

1

Collector, Cemetery fees

12

5

6

Collector, Green tolls

 

15

0

Sanitary Inspector, Trade refuse

 

12

3

County Council, re salaries

76

1

10

Water Board, re loans

98

2

1

Water Board, Office staff, etc

60

0

0

Newbury, Rent of Oakpits

4

0

0

Rectory-road Improvement, Rent

10

9

0

Overseers, Rent of offices

15

0

0

Per Loan No. 22

13

1

11

Total

902

7

9

And that the following balances were in hand on the under-mentioned accounts:-


£

s

d

General Account

748

6

11

Loan Account No. 16

408

16

6

Loan Account No. 19

387

17

6

Total

1545

0

11

Tradesmen’s and Other Accounts

A number of accounts, amounting to £569/3/3 were examined and passed for payment.

The report was adopted.

Health and Sanitary Committee

A meeting of the Health and Sanitary Committee was held at the Council Buildings on Wednesday, the 5th April, 1911, when there were present:- Messrs. J. Claridge (chairman), F. Knight, C. Bates, J. Spencer, G. H. Skinner, T. Swindall, and the Ven. A. Kitchin.

Health and Sanitary Reports

The Medical Officer reported that five cases of infectious disease had been notified since the last meeting, viz., three of diphtheria and two of erysipelas. The Medical Officer further informed the Committee that several cases of measles had occurred among children attending the public elementary schools of the town.

The Sanitary Inspector reported that he commenced duties, as arranged, on the 20th March.

With regard to the diphtheria cases mentioned in the Medical Officer’s report, the Inspector stated that he had made careful inspection of the houses, as well as making the usual detailed enquiries, but could find nothing to account for the outbreak. The usual exclusion notices had been sent to the schools.

A bed had been destroyed, after a death from consumption, on the recommendation of the Medical Attendant, and the owner requested to be compensated to the extent of 10s. 0d. The Committee resolved to recommend the Council to agree to this.

Attention was called to the state of a house in Victoria-road. The Inspector stated that the occupier promised to remedy the defects within a week, and the Committee instructed him to inspect the premises at the end of that time and report to the chairman.

A visit had been made to the Small Pox Hospital by the Inspector, accompanied by the Chairman and Vice-chairman of the Council, and on inspection had been found to be in a very fair condition.

An application had been received from Messrs. C. A. Bailey and Co., rag and bone dealers in Washbrook-road, for registration as marine store dealers. The Clerk advised the Committee that no registration was necessary in the district of this Council and he was instructed to reply to Messrs. Bailey and Co. accordingly.

Inspector’s Office

The Sanitary Inspector was authorised to obtain certain necessary stores and stationary for use in his department.

Combined Drainage

A circular from the Town Clerk of Reigate was received, asking the Council to join with that Corporation in a petition to the Local Government Board asking that steps might be taken with regard to the Bill now before Parliament known as the Local Authorities Combined Drainage Bill, to have the same so amended that it might be a public measure instead of applying only to certain authorities named in the schedule. A circular was also received from the Urban District Councils Association stating that a Bill on the same subject had been prepared on behalf of that Association and the Association of Municipal Corporations. The provisions of this Bill had been discussed with the Local Government Board and the Bill as finally settled on behalf of the two Associations had been introduced into the House of Commons by the Presidents of the respective Associations and some of the Vice-presidents. The Secretary forwarded a copy of the Bill as introduced, and requested that this Council might ask their local member to support it.

It was unanimously resolved to recommend the Council to ask Mr. Chiozza Money to give the Bill all the support in his power.

Dairies, Milkshops and Cowsheds Order

The quarterly report of Mr. Bainbridge was received, from which it appeared that on February 27th, 28th, and March 2nd he had visited 6 premises belonging to 24 cowkeepers and inspected 284 cows and heifers, making special examination of their udders and throats. The Committee considered the report very satisfactory and instructed the Inspector to keep certain of the cows under observation.

The report was adopted.

The Peace Movement

Mr. Bazeley, in accordance with notice, moved a resolution to the effect that the Council fully approved of the proposed treaty of arbitration for the settlement of all disputes which might arise between Great Britain and the United States. He also moved that copies of the resolution be sent to the Prime Minister and the Foreign Secretary. He thought the resolution would commend itself to every member of the Council. Any thinking man or woman with a spark of humanity about them must regard war between two civilised countries with the greatest amount of horror. When a war of any magnitude broke out it was the pick of the manhood of the country that was sent up to the front and the country could not afford to lose its best men. It was time, too, that a halt was called in the burden of armaments. They would soon be reaching an expenditure of £100,000,000 per annum in time of peace and the burden that involved was getting intolerable. That burden, they would all admit, pressed most heavily on the working class of the country. Trade unionists had been agitating for years for a free breakfast table, but there was no chance of that with the present heavy armaments. The wages of the workers were much lower than they ought to be if they were to live in comfort and it meant underfeeding and underclothing. From all standpoints he thought they should do all they could to favour the proposed treaty between the United States and this country.

Mr. Clipson seconded the motion with much pleasure and hoped the negotiations would be brought to a successful issue.

Mr. Spencer, supporting, said he hoped to see the peace movement extended so that mankind might go forward united without respect to creeds or race. In the last 16 years our navy expenditure had increased 250 per cent. and the army expenditure had increased 100 per cent. The total expenditure this year was £78,000,000, and with £28,000,000 for interest on war debts we had an expenditure of over £100,000,000 on preparation for wars or payment for past wars.

The Ven. A. Kitchin said every member of the Council would unquestionably be in favour of the resolution in the abstract, but whether it was possible to bring war entirely to an end was another matter. They ought to do all they could to encourage the submission of important questions to arbitration, and if the United Kingdom and the United States could decide that under no circumstances would they go to war between themselves it should have a great influence on other nations. He thought it would be a great mistake, however, to live in a fools’ paradise. Supposing all matters were submitted to arbitration, what means, other than war, would there be of settling a question if one of the parties did not accept the verdict of arbitration? As the matter had been raised by the Labour Party, he would point out that that party had in many cases not been able to settle matters by arbitration on a satisfactory basis. The advice of leaders had also been disregarded. For his part he could not see much difference between a strike and war – (Mr. Bazeley : There’s a great deal.) – when a strike resulted in the breaking of heads. He thought the Labour party were rather ill advised to press the matter forward and that it was a case of “Physician, heal thyself.” They should first of all look at home and when they could settle their local, national, and industrial matters it seemed to him it would be time enough to tell the world what they ought to do. He was afraid that time was far in the distance.

Mr. Ballard strongly supported the resolution, and thanked the Labour party for bringing it forward.

Mr. Bazeley said he would read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest what Councillor Kitchin had said, but it did not really touch him. He was a firm believer in arbitration. It was when one side did not mean to come to a settlement that friction arose. With all deference to Councillor Kitchin, there was a great deal of difference between a strike and a war, but it was hardly necessary to debate that, and he wished to point out that the leaders of the Labour party must not be blamed for all they saw done by the rank and file.

The resolution was carried unanimously.

Votes of Thanks

Mr. Swindall, as that was the last meeting of the Council, proposed with pleasure that the best thanks of the Council be given to Mr. Knight for the way in which he had presided over the meetings of the Council during the last 12 months.

The Ven. A. Kitchin seconded the motion. Mr. Knight was very much respected in the town and everything he undertook was undertaken with quiet judgment. They must all feel that in the past year he had added lustre to the chairmanship.

Mr. Bates supported the motion and fully agreed with what had been said.

Mr. Clipson also supported and said Mr. Knight had carried the meetings through in a very business-like manner.

The motion was carried with acclamation.

The Chairman, in reply, warmly thanked the Council and said his year of office had been a very pleasant one. He did not think he had heard an unkind word during the year. There did not seem to be any axes to grind and the one aim of the members of the Council seemed to be to do their best for everyone in the town. Nothing heroic had been done during the year, but one or two improvements had been made for the benefit of the town. The Rectory-road improvement would be very much appreciated, and he hoped that the time was not long distant when that improvement would be continued as far as the railway-station. (Hear, hear) Other things done in the town through the watchfulness of the Surveyor had made the town more acceptable to residents. During his (the Chairman’s) year of office ten years ago it was his painful duty to attend the funeral service of Queen Victoria and this year it had been his duty to attend the funeral service of the late King Edward VII. He had no doubt that the peace resolution passed that night was in some measure due to King Edward’s work. He had been very fortunate in having the assistance of Mr. Claridge as vice-chairman and the united support and assistance of the members and officers of the Council. He thanked them all for their help and also wished to thank the Press for the careful way in which the meetings were reported.

A hearty vote of thanks was accorded to the Vice-chairman, on the motion of Mr. G. Miller, seconded by Mr. Clipson, and supported by the Chairman, and Mr. Claridge briefly replied.

21st April 1911

The Annual Meeting

Mr. John Claridge Elected Chairman

Coronation Festivities

The annual meeting of the Rushden Urban District Council was held at the Council Chambers on Wednesday night, when there were present :- Mr. F. Knight (retiring chairman), Mr. J. Claridge (retiring vice-chairman), the Ven. A. Kitchin, Messrs. G. H. Skinner, G. Miller, F. Ballard, C. E. Bayes, J. S. Clipson, T. Swindall, C. Bates, J. Spencer, and W. Bazeley, with the Clerk (Mr. G. S. Mason), the Surveyor (Mr. W. B. Madin), and the Sanitary Inspector (Mr. F. J. Allen).

Election of Chairman

Mr. Knight said it gave him special pleasure to move the appointment as Chairman for the ensuing year of a gentleman with whom he had been associated, as the old song had it, for more than 40 years. They were schoolfellows for a time, and Mr. Claridge and he had many an encounter on the cricket field subsequently. Since then they had been associated in their humble way in the endeavour to improve the town in which they lived. He hoped their work had not been altogether in vain. They all knew Mr. Claridge and the interest he took in all things that tended to the benefit of the town, and he was sure the kindly feeling shown to himself during his year of office would be extended to Mr. Claridge in his. During the coming year Mr. Claridge would have considerable claims on his time, and would, he was sure, readily meet those claims. They had the coronation festivities in front of them and also the enlargement of the sewerage scheme. He had no doubt every member of the Council would give every assistance to Mr. Claridge when he undertook the duties, and he was quite sure Mr. Claridge would fill the position in the most

Fair and Generous Manner.

He had very great pleasure in proposing that Mr. Claridge be Chairman for the ensuing year.

Mr. Swindall seconded the motion, and said he was sure the town’s feeling was that Mr. Claridge should be Chairman. The duty was no light one, but Mr. Claridge would occupy the chair with credit to the town and honour to himself.

The motion was agreed to, nem. con.

Mr. Claridge, in taking the chair, said Mr. Knight and Mr. Swindall had been much too kind in what they had said. Though he had filled the chair before, he felt this time more inclined to shirk the position. Unless he had their kind assistance and support he could not fulfil the duties of the chair with satisfaction to them or to the town. He would, however, try to do his duty to the best of his ability, and with regard to the Coronation festivities and other things – whether they would do anything in memory of the late King remained to be seen – he would throw himself into them as heartily as he could. He asked the Council for their assistance and thanked them very much for the kind things which had been said and the honour they had done him.

Election of Vice-Chairman

Mr. Skinner moved the election of Mr. G. Miller as vice-chairman, and said he had always been well up the poll. Mr. Miller was well up in all matters relating to the county and the town, and no one in the room was more entitled to the vice-chair.

The Ven. A. Kitchin seconded the motion with great pleasure. Mr. Miller was known and respected by all parties in Rushden and had always taken extreme interest in the welfare of the town.

Mr. Bazeley, with no disrespect to Mr. Miller, proposed Mr. C. Bates for the vice-chair. Mr. Bates had commended himself to the electors and had been very regular in his attendance at the meetings. If they elected Mr. Bates, they would find him always willing and ready to support the Chairman in his duties.

Mr. Spencer seconded the amendment and said Mr. Bates would make a very good vice-chairman. He thought the arrangement that each section of the Council should provide the Chairman in turn was a very wise one, and that the Labour side was now entitled to be represented.

The voting resulted in the election of Mr. Miller, who, in taking the vice-chair said no one was more conscious of lack of ability to fill the position than himself, but he would do his best. He did not anticipate that his duties would be very heavy, as they had elected a very strong Chairman. He had not sought the position, and he would have preferred seeing the Ven. A. Kitchin elected, but he himself did not shirk the position and he thanked them for the honour they had one him.

Tip-Cat in the Streets

The Ven. A. Kitchin, referring to a resolution passed at the last meeting of the Council regarding the playing of “tip-cat” in the streets, said he saw a little girl playing the game and wondered whether he was supposed to give her into the charge of the police. As a matter of fact he did nothing. [Please can you tell us how to play this game?]

Mr. Clipson asked what was the position of a member of the Council in such a case.

The Clerk said the duties of the Council in regard to that matter ceased in the Council room.

Coronation

The various committees having been appointed, the chairman said the people of the town were asking what was going to be done at the time of the Coronation. He took it that the least they could do would be about the same as at the previous Coronation and at the jubilee.

The Ven. A. Kitchin asked how the money would be raised. He believed the Council could spend up to a penny rate.

The Chairman said the expense was met by voluntary contributions.

Mr. Skinner : The rates are high enough now.

Mr. Swindall : Going to the rates for the purpose would have my strong opposition.

Mr. Knight thought they should call a town’s meeting. They could not collect the money except by taking the public into their confidence. They had taken upon themselves to engage the Temperance Band, who met them in a generous way by offering to stay at home for half what they would have got away at Coventry. He would move that at the earliest date the Chairman call a town’s meeting to discuss the best way of carrying out the festivities.

Mr. Clipson seconded the motion.

The Ven. A. Kitchin asked what was the amount spent at the last coronation.

The Chairman believed it was about £280.

The motion was carried.

The Chairman, observing that Messrs. Bazeley, Spencer, and Bates did not vote, said he was sorry to see that their Labour friends did not take part in that matter.

Mr. Spencer : It is a matter of conspiracy between Toryism and Liberalism in depriving us of the vice-chairmanship. We have had the same thing happen on other bodies, and the same feeling prevails here.

The Chairman : I must call you to order for that.

Mr. Spencer : Anyhow, our Liberal friends prefer to vote for Tories rather than Labour men.

The Chairman : I don’t think you need look at the matter like that.

The Estimates

It was decided to hold a meeting of the whole Council in committee on Wednesday next to consider the estimates for the ensuing year.



Click here to return to the main index of features
Click here to return to the History index
Click here to e-mail us