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Rushden Echo, 19th August, 1921, transcribed by Gill Hollis
Rushden Urban District Council
Football Clubs and Spencer Park
The Beautifying of The Green
Suggestion For a Market Place
War Memorial

Wednesday, present Councillors W. Bazeley, J.P. (chairman), T. Swindall (vice-chairman), F. Knight, J.P., C. Bates, J. Hornsby, C. W. Horrell, C. E. Bayes, T. Wilmott, with the Clerk (Mr. G. S. Mason), the Surveyor (Mr. W. B. Madin), and the Sanitary Inspector (Mr. Piper).

Housing Committee

A meeting of the Housing Committee was held at the Council Buildings on Thursday, the 21st July, 1921, when there were present:- Messrs. F. Knight (chairman), W. Bazeley, C. E. Bayes, T. Swindall and T. Wilmott.

Poultry Houses

An application was received from Mr. B. George, of No. 85, Trafford-road, for permission to keep poultry at the far end of his garden.

The Committee did not think it desirable to allow a miscellaneous assortment of poultry houses to be erected in the gardens, but on the completion of the housing scheme thought they might decide on some suitable model which could be erected in positions approved by the Committee by those tenants who wished to keep poultry, and the Clerk was instructed to reply to Mr. George to this effect.

Tenders

Tenders were received for the erection of a further 25 houses all of the new type. The lowest tender amounted to £15,130, and it was resolved to authorise Mr. Fisher to see the Housing Commissioner and if possible obtain his consent to the Council accepting that tender.

Further Development

With regard to the further development of the Estate, the Committee were of opinion that it would be wise to postpone bringing this matter before the Housing Commissioner until consent had been obtained to the erection of the 25 houses, tenders for which had been opened this evening.

The report was adopted.

Plans, Etc. Committee

A meeting of the Plans, Highways, and Lighting Committee was held at the Council Buildings on Wednesday, the 27th July, 1921, when there were present:- Messrs. W. Bazeley (chairman), T. Swindall, C. Bates, C. E. Bayes, and T. Wilmott.

Plans

were presented for:-

Bungalow off the Irchester-road for Mr. S. Robinson and passed.

Alterations to factory in Fitzwilliam-street for Messrs. C. W. Horrell Limited, and passed.

Newton-Road Guide Post

The tender of Mr. Arthur Sanders for the provision of a guide post, in oak, amounting to £3/16/6 was accepted.

Higham-Road

The Surveyor reported that he had been in communication with the County Surveyor as to the construction of a small length of footpath between Oak-street and Lime-street and that he had agreed to the same being charged to the ordinary expenditure in this year’s main roads account.

Road Classification

The Clerk was instructed to apply to the Ministry of Transport for a grant towards the Council’s establishment expenses in connection with the highways.

Public Lamps

The Surveyor was instructed to have the lamp columns repainted.

The report was adopted.

Finance and Estates Committee

A meeting of the Finance and Estates Committee was held at the Council Buildings on Wednesday, the 10th August, 1921, at 10 a.m. when there were present:- Messrs. W. Bazeley (chairman), T. Swindall, C. E. Bayes, F. Knight, and T. Wilmott.

Surveyor’s Cash Account

The Committee examined the Surveyor’s cash account with the wages books the expenditure shown therein being as follows:-


£

s

d

Week ending 7th July, 1921

117

15

9

Week ending 14th July, 1921

116

15

5

Week ending 21st July, 1921

109

16

9

Week ending 28th July, 1921

115

15

2

Week ending 4th August, 1921

103

0

6

Collector’s Accounts

The Collector’s accounts were also examined from which it appeared that he had collected the following sums since the last meeting:-


£

s

d

General District Rate

1977

0

8

Fittings

10

6

0

Green Tolls

3

8

6

A Housing Scheme rents

117

11

8

King’s Road Cottages

67

9

8

Burial Fees, &c

30

5

3

Treasurer’s Accounts

The Committee also examined the Treasurer’s accounts, from which it appeared that he had received the following sums since the last meeting of the Committee:-


£

s

d

Library, fees, &c

1

19

5

Collector, rate

1977

0

8

Collector, fittings

10

6

0

Collector, Green tolls

3

8

6

Collector, Cottage rents

185

1

4

Cemetery Registrar, Burial fees, &c

30

5

3

Paymaster General, Unemployment grant

605

0

0

Brooke and Brooke, Pawnbroker’s Licence

1

0

Twelftree, Chimney on fire

2

6

L. L. & Globe Co., Hospital fire

2

10

0

L. L. & Globe Co., Exting. Exs.

4

10

0

Magistrates Clerk, half-fines

1

10

0

Total

2,821

14

8

And that the balances were as follows:-


£

s

d

General account

2511

19

11

Loan account No. 16

33

2

3

Loan account No. 30 o/d

1292

14

6

Loan account No. 32

1185

0

0

Loan Account No. 33

9780

16

7

Loan Account No. 34

857

8

0

Tradesmen’s and Other Accounts

A number of accounts amounting to £1618/3/7 were examined and passed for payment.

Outside Liability

The Clerk submitted a quotation from the London, Liverpool, and Globe Insurance Co., for a policy covering the Council against all outside liability.

It was resolved to recommend the Council to take out a policy as per the quotation, except with regard to the Hospital, Farm, and houses at an annual premium of £25 10s.

Main Roads

The Surveyor reported the receipt of a letter from the County Surveyor fixing the sum of £2,625 as the sum payable to this Council in respect of the main roads for the year 1922-23.

The report was adopted.

Health and Sanitary Committee

A meeting of the Health and Sanitary Committee was held at the Council Buildings on Wednesday, the 10th August, 1921, when there were present:- Messrs. T. Swindall (chairman), W. Bazeley, F. Knight, J. Hornsby, and J. Spencer.

Health and Sanitary Reports

The report of the Medical Officer for the month of July was received.

The Sanitary Inspector reported that 17 preliminary and 2 statutory notices had been issued since the last meeting calling attention to nuisances, &c, and the number of nuisances now outstanding numbered 57.

The organs of an ox, voluntarily surrendered, were found upon examination to be tubercular and destroyed in the usual way as being unfit for the food of man. The total weight was 1qr. 12lbs.

A quantity of fruit and vegetables, weighing 1 ton 6 cwt. 6 lbs., had also been destroyed, being unfit for human consumption.

The Inspector gave a detailed statement of his work during the past month.

Woburn Place

The Inspector also reported that since the last meeting he had interviewed the owner of this property on the site who had agreed to remedy the defects and the work had been placed in the hands of a builder.

Refuse Receptacles

The Inspector of Nuisances submitted a report with regard to a number of houses showing the nature of the accommodation for the deposit of refuse.

It appeared to the Committee by this report that the houses therein referred to were without a sufficient ashtub, ashpit, or other receptacle for the deposit of refuse and it was resolved to report to the Council accordingly with a recommendation that notices be served upon the owner requiring him within 28 days to provide for each house a sufficient and proper receptacle.

Scavenging

Attention was called to the large additional expense incurred in the removal of the house refuse by reason of the quantity of waste paper put into the receptacles, and the hope was expressed that the public would as far as possible burn rubbish of this nature in their copper fires.

Horses

The Depot Sub-Committee reported that one of the horses was slightly lame, and recommended that it be transferred to the Sewage Farm for a time and only used occasionally for light work on the roads. They also recommended that a farm cart and various implements be purchased for use at the farm. This would necessitate the purchase of another horse and harness for town work, and it was resolved to recommend the Council to purchase one and to adopt the recommendations of the Sub-Committee.

The report was adopted, the Chairman pointing out that half the refuse carried away from the houses was waste paper. If this could be burned it would effect a big saving.

Spencer Park

The Parks Committee reported that they had received applications from six football clubs for pitches in Spencer Park, but, in consequence of the state of the ground, they recommended that none of them should be granted.

The Chairman explained that Spencer Park would not be fit for football during the coming season.

Mr. Knight said it was quite impossible, through the drought, to continue the work of making the bowling greens and tennis courts, as arranged, but now that the drought was broken they would probably require the workmen to be there, finishing the work, and the committee felt that they could not put any obstacle in the way of the workpeople. Part of the park had been levelled, and owing to the drought they could not turf it; and if the clubs played football upon it the ground would only become a quagmire in the winter. If no play was allowed on the ground during the coming winter, they could make the ground a credit to the town for the following season. It was for the benefit of the park in the future that they proposed to prohibit football there during the coming season.

Mr. Swindall: I think the public should take this as an intimation that no football can be played on the ground in the daytime by youths who belonged to no club, for this would do just as much damage to the ground as the clubs playing.

The Chairman: It is unfortunate that we cannot alter the situation, but the weather prevented us making the improvement.

Mr. Knight: If we find that any damage is being done to the ground, and that the recovery of the ground is being hindered, the Parks Committee can deal with it.

The War Memorial

A letter was read from Mr. Weale, secretary of the War Memorial Committee, respecting the site on the Green for the monument now being erected, and asking if it was the intention of the Council to undertake the laying out of the Green when the monument was finished.

Mr. Horrell: Will the whole of the money subscribed for the war memorial be consumed in the cost of the memorial itself?

Mr. Knight: I do not think there will be much to spare.

Mr. Wilmott: I understood at the committee meeting that if the Council can do nothing then the Memorial Committee feel that they would have to put a fence round. If the Council think of beautifying the Green then the money they would otherwise use in fencing can go towards the cost of the improvement.

Mr. Horrell: I think the Council should make the ground suitable for the memorial, and I think a plan should be prepared, showing the suggested work. To leave the Green as it is, and thus allow the children to climb the monument would be a disgrace to the town. I move that it be left to the Highways Committee to get out a plan and submit it to the Council.

Mr. Knight seconded.

The Chairman: Some time ago a plan appeared in the “Rushden Echo,” as prepared by Mr. Preston, for beautifying the Green, and it is probably in the minds of the members of the Council that something like that should be carried out. But another question arises. If we prohibit the people having

Stalls On The Green

the Council may be expected to find a site elsewhere for the stalls. I think myself that as a temporary arrangement the stalls might be allowed in College-street. I think the Green could, at a moderate expense, be made a very pretty little spot. The ground lays itself out for it.

Mr. Knight: I agree with the Chairman’s remarks about clearing the noisy element off the Green. No doubt some other place will have to be provided. I have a scheme under consideration, and have made certain inquiries with regard to a small piece of land necessary for a market, and if that can be carried out we could also make a very great public improvement at the same time. I suggest that, however much we desire to refrain from expenditure, we as a growing town will not be able to neglect certain improvements when the proper time comes. That plan, which appeared in the “Rushden Echo,” was got out at the suggestion of Mr. Charles Smith. It would be a great boon to the town if the rowdy element could be moved from the front of the church and the monument. There is a tremendous lot of traffic – especially motor traffic – going through there, and though we have so far escaped

Serious Accidents

we ought to guard against the danger in the future.

Mr. Hornsby thought a deputation from the Memorial Committee could meet the Highways Committee and go into the question. If they left the Green in its present state it would not be such a nice monument to the fallen as they could wish.

Mr. Wilmott: I think the Highways Committee should thrash out the question first, before meeting the Memorial Committee. (Hear, hear.) If we carry out the improvement it would be one of the finest in the town. Can Mr. Knight get us the information?

Mr. Knight: I will undertake to do that.

Mr. Horrell asked if the responsibility for finding a place for the stalls rested with the Council.

The Chairman said the stallholders came and sold things in the town and a great number of the public were in favour of that sort of thing as they thought it had a bearing on the market price of commodities in the town. He thought there would be a good deal of resentment if the stall-holders were shut out.

Mr. Horrell’s proposition was carried.



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