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The Rushden Echo, 16th January, 1920, transcribed by Gill Hollis
Rushden Urban District Council

The Voting on The War Memorial
Workmen Apply For Increased Wages
The Coming of The Tank
“Luxury” Building

Wednesday, present: Councillors F. Knight, J.P. (Chairman), J. Claridge, J.P., C.C., (Vice-chairman), W. Bazeley, J.P., C. Bates, J. Spencer, J.P., J. Hornsby, T. Swindall, C. E. Bayes, T. Wilmott, L. Perkins, B.Sc., and J. Tomlin, with the Clerk (Mr. G. S. Mason), the Surveyor (Mr. W. B. Madin), and the Acting Sanitary Inspector (Mr. A. E. Lloyd).

Plans, &c., Committee

A meeting of the Plans, Highways and Lighting Committee was held at the Council Buildings on Wednesday, the 31st December, 1919, when there were present:- Messrs. F. Knight (chairman), J. Claridge, W. Bazeley, J. Spencer, T. Swindall, and T. Wilmott.

Plans

were presented for :-

Additions to the Trades Union Club on the Higham-road and passed.

Shop and offices in the High-street for Messrs Lands, Ltd. and passed.

Motor garage and shed in Rectory-road for Messrs. F. England Smith and Co., and passed.

Additions and alterations to the “Mecca,” High-street, for Messrs. Cave Bros., and passed.

Motor garage in Essex road for Mr. E. Wrighton and no exception taken.

Knackers’ yard and slaughterhouse on the Shirley Park Estate for Messrs. G. Chettle and Sons and passed subject to the slaughterhouse walls having an impervious dado 4½ feet in height and the boiler chimney being not less than 39 feet in height.

A barn on the St. Crispin Estate for Mr. A. Dickens and no exception taken.

The Surveyor reported that during the year 1919 plans had been passed for the erection of 27 houses and for 67 buildings of a miscellaneous character.

Workmen’s Wages

The application from the Amalgamated Workers’ Union for an increase of 10s. per week on the War Bonus paid to the Council’s workmen, referred to this Committee by the Council at their last meeting, was considered, and the Surveyor instructed to prepare a report on the wages at present paid together with a proposal for the revision of certain of the wages, and submit to the next meeting of the Finance Committee.

Fire Brigade

A letter was received from the Clerk to the Irchester Parish Council asking if in the event of an outbreak of fire in that parish they could depend on the assistance of the Rushden Fire Brigade, and if so upon what terms.

The Clerk was instructed to reply that the Brigade would be pleased to attend, if not otherwise engaged, and to enclose a copy of the scale of charges for out-of-town fires.

Damage to Tree Guard

The Surveyor reported that a tree guard near the station approach was damaged on the 16th December by Messrs. Higgins and Sons’ lorry. He was instructed to have the guard repaired and forward the account there-for to Messrs. Higgins for payment.

Trees

The Surveyor was instructed to arrange for the pruning of the trees on the various roads.

Damage to Lamp Column

The Surveyor also reported that a lamp near the Feathers Inn had been damaged by the Union Petroleum Company’s lorry coming into contact therewith. It was resolved to make a claim against the driver of the vehicle for the cost of the repairs.

Four Roads Estate

The Committee had before them a proposal for effecting an improvement on the Wellingborough-road at its junction with Irchester-road by rounding off the corner, The Committee decided to meet on the site on Monday next at 1.45 p.m.

The Committee subsequently met on the site and instructed the surveyor to carry out the improvement as suggested.

The report was adopted, the Chairman remarking that the 27 houses for which plans were passed in 1919 were mostly the Council houses, and he was sorry they were not ready for occupation, but he hoped they would be during the present year. The plans passed of a “miscellaneous character” were mostly luxury buildings, and he regretted they were not prohibited so that the workmen could get on with the erection of houses. The Wellingborough-road corner improvement would be carried out by the Council’s labour.

Finance and Estates Committee

A meeting of the Finance and Estates Committee was held at the Council Buildings on Wednesday, the 7th January, 1920, at 10 a.m., when there were present: - Messrs. F. Knight (chairman), C. Bates, J. Claridge, C. W. Horrell, J. Spencer, and T. Wilmott.

Surveyor’s Cash Account

The Committee examined the Surveyor’s cash account with the wages book, the expenditure shown therein being as follows:-


£

s

d

Week ending 4th Dec., 1919

81

13

4

Week ending 11th Dec., 1919

84

17

2

Week ending 18th Dec., 1919

85

11

3

Week ending 25th Dec., 1919

85

6

3

Week ending 1st Jan., 1920

79

9

3

Collector’s Accounts

The Collector’s accounts were also examined, from which it appeared that he had collected the following sums since the last meeting:-


£

s

d

General District Rate

905

9

10

Fittings

13

16

4

Cottage rents

50

16

4

Green tolls

1

8

0

Burial fees, etc.

19

5

6

Treasurer’s Accounts

The Committee also examined the Treasurer’s accounts, from which it appeared that he had received the following sums since the last meeting:-


£

s

d

Collector, G. D. Rate

905

9

10

Collector, Fittings

13

16

4

Collector, Cottage rents

50

16

9

Collector, Green tolls

1

8

0

Cemetery Registrar, Burial fees, etc.

19

5

6

Clarke, Chimney on fire


2

6

J. Austin & Son, Petrol licence


2

0

Free Library, Fees, etc.

2

3

3

County Council, Main roads, tarring

98

4

4

County Council, Main roads, 1918/19

249

4

8

Magistrates’ Clerk, Half fines

4

0

Total

1340

17

2

And that the following balances were in his hands:-


£

s

d

General account

2536

4

2

Loan account No. 16

33

2

3

Loan account No. 29

4

4

4

Loan account No. 30

14433

13

0

Loan account No. 31

98

17

6

Tradesmen’s and Other Accounts

A number of accounts amounting to £1082 6s. 11d. were examined and passed for payment.

Workmen’s Wages

The Surveyor submitted a list of the various workmen now engaged by the Council showing the amount of wages received by them as last revised in July, 1919, with his recommendation for increases.

The Committee considered the list in detail and unanimously resolved to adopt the suggestions of the Surveyor.

The report was adopted.

Health and Sanitary Committee

A meeting of the Health and Sanitary Committee was held at the Council Buildings on Wednesday, the 7th January, 1920, when there were present:- Messrs. J. Claridge (chairman), F. Knight, C. E. Bayes, C. W. Horrell, J. Hornsby, and J. Tomlin.

Health and Sanitary Reports

The report of the Medical Officer for the month of December was received.

The Inspector of Nuisances reported that during the past month he had served 22 preliminary notices calling attention to nuisances and other matters all of which were receiving attention.

Two lots of infected bedding had been destroyed after deaths from infectious disease and the rooms cleansed. It was resolved to recommend the Council to replace part of the bedding destroyed in one of the cases at a cost not exceeding £1/7/6.

A book belonging to the Public Library found in an infected house had also been destroyed. It was resolved to recommend the Council to replace the book.

During the month a quantity of unsound tins of fish, fruit, etc., had been surrendered and destroyed in the usual way as being unfit for human consumption.

A sample of water had been taken from a well at No. 25, Crabb-street, which upon analysis by the Medical Officer proved to be unfit for domestic purposes. The owner had since given instructions for the well to be closed and the town water laid on to the property.

Defective yard paving in various parts of the town had been repaired or renewed during the month.

The Inspector gave a detailed statement of his work since the last meeting.

Petroleum Acts

An application was received from Messrs. Lawrence and Richardson for permission to store petrol and carbide of calcium on their premises in Washbrook-road and it was resolved to recommend the Council to accede thereto.

Dairies, Cowsheds, and Milkshops Order

The quarterly report of Mr. Bainbridge was received, from which it appeared that on the 13th, 15th, 18th, 19th, and 20th December, 1919, he visited 31 premises and inspected 225 cows and heifers, making special examination of their udders and throats. The Inspector was instructed to keep one of the cows mentioned therein under his observation.

Cemetery

The half-yearly report of the Cemetery Registrar was received from which it appeared that there had been 63 interments during that period. The grave spaces purchased were 28 and three had been reserved for a period of 14 years. Four headstones had been erected and seven spaces enclosed with marble kerbing. The total receipts for the half-year were £91/9/4 and no fees were outstanding.

Destruction of Rats

The letter from the County Council with regard to the destruction of rats referred to this Committee by the Council at their last meeting was considered.

The Surveyor was authorised to employ certain persons for this purpose and the Clerk was instructed to issue hand bills calling attention to the recent Act of Parliament requiring all persons to destroy rats upon their premises.

The report was adopted.

War Memorial

The Clerk reported that the card voting on the two war memorial schemes was as follows:-

For the Cottage Hospital
5428
For the Institute Hall
1296
Cards not filled up
258
Cards distributed (about)
9500

Mr. Bazeley asked what the next step would be. He thought it would be best to invite all the organisations in the town to send representatives to a meeting to elect a committee on a broad democratic basis to proceed with the hospital.

Mr. Claridge thought the best thing would be for the present committee to ascertain what financial help would be forthcoming.

Mr. Swindall said the voting was very emphatic, and he thought the Council should now give a lead.

Mr. Spencer moved that the chairman of the Council convene a meeting of the organisations of the town to see what was to be done.

Mr. Bates seconded.

The Chairman said that if the Council wished it he should call the meeting, not that he was in favour of the hospital. He was sorry that other schemes were not considered at the same time, and in particular a memorial, pure and simple, to those who had fallen. He was sure he was speaking for 90 per cent. of those who had lost sons or husbands when he said that they desired a memorial of that description, erected for the specific object of a memorial to the fallen. If the Cottage Hospital or Institute were required they should be obtained and the money provided for them. He did not think any memorial would represent the feelings of the people and be so generally appreciated as a memorial of the character he had alluded to.

Mr. Hornsby supported the proposal and said that after the provision of the hospital a memorial to the fallen could be provided in addition.

Mr. Perkins said that the fact that the people had not a third choice was the fault of the Council, because he proposed a line for a third alternative but the Council declined to adopt it.

Mr. Spencer’s proposition was carried.

Public Conveniences

Mr. Bazeley, according to notice, moved that steps be taken at once to provide public conveniences for both sexes, the work to be done by direct labour, and the site to be on the Green. He said that the matter had been on the Labour Party’s programme for many years past. The Surveyor before the war prepared a scheme to cost about £200. Of course, it would cost more now, but by employing labour direct the Council could do the work at a reasonable cost.

Mr. Spencer seconded.

Mr. Perkins suggested that the proposition be put in three separate resolutions _ (1) that the provision be made, (2) that the work be done by direct labour, and (3) that the site be on the Green. Some of the members might agree to one point and not to another.

Mr. Wilmott said he agreed that something should be done, but he was not sure as to the site. As to cost, the glazed bricks now cost three times as much as when the Surveyor prepared the plans and estimate.

The Chairman suggested that the question be referred to the Sanitary committee and the Surveyor asked to prepare plans.

The Clerk said that a loan would be necessary, as they could not do it out of the current account.

Mr. Bazeley agreed that the question should be referred to the Sanitary Committee, and proposed this.

In this form the resolution was carried unanimously.

The Tank

A letter was received from the National Savings Committee as follows: “We beg to advise you that the Tank awarded to Rushden will be delivered about the third week in February. Owing to the difficulties of transport and the uncertain condition in which the Tank will arrive we cannot now state the exact date upon which it will be handed over. It will be necessary, however, for the permanent site to be ready not later that Feb. 21st, so that there may be no delay when the officer arrives with his crew to drive the Tank from the station depot to the site.” A further letter stated: “The Tank which will be sent to Rushden will be a Mark IV and not a Whippet.”

Housing

Mr. Bazeley said that the Council now had power to stop “luxury” building.

It was decided to ask the Housing Committee and the Surveyor to attend a conference of builders’ associations at Wellingborough on February 16th.

Fire Brigade

Mr. Willmott said that the North-Eastern District of the National Fire Brigade Union desired to hold their Spring meeting at Rushden, and the Brigade would like the fire-station to be cleaned down in view of this visit.

The Council agreed to have the work done.



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