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Rushden Echo, 19th January, 1923, transcribed by Gill Hollis
Rushden Urban District Council

REDUCTION OF SALARIES AND WAGES
SHED FOR DEFECTIVE MEAT INSPECTIONS
Improvement Scheme “Turned Down”
Railway to Raunds

  Wednesday, present: Messrs. T. Swindall, J.P. (chairman), L. Perkins, B.Sc. (vice-chairman), F. Knight, J.P., T. Wilmott, C. E. Bayes, C. W. Horrell, C.A., F. Corby, J. Hornsby, C. Bates, and G. W. Coles, J.P., with the Clerk (Mr. G. S. Mason), the Surveyor (Mr. W. B. Madin), and the Sanitary Inspector (Mr. F. S. F. Piper).

PLANS, ETC., COMMITTEE
PLANS

were presented for:

  Extensions to factory in Harborough-road for Mr. J. Jaques, and passed subject to a second or emergency staircase being provided.

  Motor garage near his house, 173, Wellingborough-road, for Mr. H. S. C. Knight, and passed.

  New boiler-house at The Laurels, Wellingborough-road, for Mr. C. W. Horrell, and passed.

  Porch to 291, Wellingborough-road, for Mr. T. Sanders, and passed.

  Alterations and additions to premises on the Wellingborough-road for the Rushden Adult School, and no exception taken.

  Open shed at the rear of Mr. F. Corby’s factory in John-street, and no exception taken.

  Additions to their club premises situate off High-street for the West End Club, and passed.

  Motor-house in High-street South for Mr. Albert Okins, near his works, and no exception taken.

  Cycle-shed in a garden at the rear of 26, Spencer-road, for Mr. W. Packwood, and no exception taken.

INFRINGEMENT OF BYE-LAWS

  The Surveyor reported that Mr. Smith had not yet removed the building erected by him, in contravention of the bye-laws, at the rear of 133, Cromwell-road; he had, however, promised, if allowed further time, to take down and re-erect the building at least 15 ft. from the adjoining premises.

  The committee resolved to recommend the Council to allow Mr. Smith until March 25th next to carry out the removal to the satisfaction of the Surveyor.

MOTOR CAUTION SIGNS

  A letter was received from the County Council asking this Council to submit a list of the existing motor caution signs in their district, and also a list of places on the district roads where the Council might think it desirable that such signs should be erected.

  The Surveyor was instructed to prepare the former list and to include in the latter the bottom of Church-street, Wellingborough-road near Duck-street, Station-road at its junction with Moor-road, and Newton-road near the Council Buildings.

HIGHAM-ROAD AND WASHBROOK-ROAD CORNER

  The Clerk reported that, as instructed at the last meeting of the Council, he had been in communication with the Unemployment Grants Committee, the County Council, and the Ministry of Labour, but up to the present had received no definite replies.

  The report was adopted.

FINANCE AND ESTATES COMMITTEE

  A meeting of the Finance and Estates Committee was held at the Council Buildings on Wednesday, Jan. 10th, 1923, at 10a.m., when there were present: Messrs. T. Swindall (chairman), L. Perkins, C. Bates, C. E. Bayes, F. Knight, and T. Wilmott.

SURVEYOR’S CASH ACCOUNT

  The committee examined the Surveyor’s cash account with the wages books, the expenditure shown therein being as follows:


£

s

d

Week ending Dec. 7th, 1922

105

15

11

Week ending Dec. 14th, 1922

107

8

4

Week ending Dec. 21st, 1922

107

13

10

Week ending Dec. 28th, 1922

99

18

1

Week ending Jan. 4th, 1923

103

1

2

COLLECTOR’S ACCOUNTS

  The Collector’s accounts were also examined, from which it appeared that he had collected the following sums during the past month:-


£

s

d

General district rate

1,727

15

2

Fittings

70

12

1

Market tolls

7

12

6

Kings-road cottage rents

80

4

6

Assisted housing scheme rents

245

14

5

Burial fees, etc

10

8

6

TREASURER’S ACCOUNTS

  The committee also examined the Treasurer’s accounts, from which it appeared that he had received the following sums during the past month:-


£

s

d

Collector, Rate

1,727

15

2

Collector, Fittings

70

12

1

Collector, Market tolls

7

12

6

Collector, Cottage rents

325

18

11

Cemetery Registrar, Burial fees, etc

10

8

6

Austin & Son – petrol licence


2

0

Library – fees, etc

1

16

9

Mission F.C. – Spencer Park

1

0

0

Clerk – Insurance commission

1

0

5

Total

2,146

6

4

And that the following balances were in his hands:-


£

s

d

General account

1,262

14

8

Loan account No. 16

33

2

3

Loan account No. 33

1,976

17

9

TRADESMEN’S AND OTHER ACCOUNTS

  A number of accounts amounting to £2,142  7s.  7d. were examined and passed for payment.

AUDIT

  The Chairman reported that he had received a letter from the District auditor, Mr. G. L. Gibson, stating that he completed the audit of the accounts of the Council for the year ended March 31st last on Dec. 8th.  There appeared to be nothing to which he need draw the attention of the Council.

WAR PENSIONS ACTS

  The Clerk submitted a letter from the Chief Area Officer at Wellingborough, date Jan. 1st, giving the Council one month’s notice of termination of tenancy of the room occupied by his committee at the Library.

  It was resolved to recommend the Council to accept the notice.

MAIN ROADS

  Correspondence that had passed between the Clerk and the County Accountant with regard to the payment by the County Council for the maintenance of the main roads in this district was read.

  The report was adopted.

HEALTH AND SANITARY COMMITTEE

  A meeting of the Health and Sanitary Committee was held at the Council Buildings on Wednesday, Jan. 10th, 1923, when there were present: Messrs. L. Perkins (chairman), T. Swindall, C. Claridge, F. Corby, and Fred Knight.

HEALTH AND SANITARY REPORTS

  The report of the Medical Officer for the month of December was received.

  The Sanitary Inspector reported that 35 nuisances had been dealt with during the past month, and of that number 23 had been abated.  Of the outstanding nuisances, 25 had also been abated.

  Five rooms had been disinfected after cases of notifiable disease.

  The Inspector had made 37 visits to premises where food was prepared or sold, when meat to the weight of 2 cwt. 17 lb., all of which was voluntarily surrendered, had been found to be unfit for human consumption and destroyed in the usual way.

  The Inspector also gave a detailed report of his work since the last meeting.

CEMETERY

  The half-yearly report of the Cemetery Registrar was received, from which it appeared that the interments during that period had been 53.

  Eleven grave spaces had been purchased and four reserved for a period of 14 years.

  Five head-stones had been erected and 22 kerbs laid, while 13 additional inscriptions had been engraved on existing memorials.

  The receipts for the half-year had been £68  18s., and no fees were outstanding.

  The Committee considered the report very satisfactory.

  The Surveyor was instructed to proceed with the planting of a beech hedge and trees at the south end of the cemetery near Messrs. Selwood’s boundary.

DAIRIES, COWSHEDS, AND MILKSHOPS ORDER

  The quarterly report of the Veterinary Inspector was received, from which it appeared that on Dec. 11th, 12th, and 13th last he visited 26 premises in this district and inspected 178 cows, making an individual examination of each udder.  There was nothing to which he need draw the attention of the Council.

  The report was considered highly satisfactory.

SLAUGHTERHOUSE LICENCES

  Applications were received from the Rushden Industrial Co-operative Society, Messrs. J. Knight and Son, and Mr. E. Warren for renewals of their respective slaughterhouse licences, and it was resolved to recommend the Council to accede thereto.

MILK AND DAIRIES ACT, 1922

  The Sanitary Inspector also reported that applications had been received for registration under this Act as follow:

Retail Purveyors – Messrs. E. Warren, J. W. Watson, N. M. King, W. Hyde, J. Seamark, W. Allen, O. H. Ireson, F. A. Mortimer, G. White, F. Corby, F. Collins, B. Smith, and the Rushden Industrial Co-operative Society;

Cowkeepers and Wholesalers – Messrs. E. Warren, J. W. Watson, N. M. King, W. Allen, G. White, F. Corby, F. Collins, B. Smith, and the Rushden Industrial Co-operative Society;

and it was resolved to recommend the Council that their names be placed on the respective registers.

MEAT INSPECTING SHED

  The Depot Sub-Committee reported that, as instructed at the last meeting, they had considered the question of the provision of a meat-inspecting shed, and had decided to recommend to the committee that one of the existing sheds at the Newton-road depot be adapted for this purpose; the estimated cost of such adaptation was £12.  An alternative scheme was the erection of a shed, 10ft. by 8ft., in the centre of the yard, at an estimated cost of £33.

  It was resolved to recommend the Council to adopt the sub-committee’s recommendation.

  Mr. Perkins, presenting the above part of the report, said that meat-inspecting arrangements as at present were not fully satisfactory.  Diseased meat had either to be taken to the Medical Officer and Sanitary Inspector, or those offices had to go to where the diseased meat was placed.  There was no good provision at present for storing meat before it had been inspected.

  Mr. Coles said it was part of his duties to sign for the destruction of diseased meat, and it was not pleasant when the meat lay on the floor, sometimes for 24 hours, covered only by a waterproof, and in the summer attracting a swarm of flies.

  Mr. Knight: I shall have to oppose the recommendation of the sub-committee as far as making use of the tool-house, which is used not only for that purpose.  Men are continually going in and out.  If meat is there for 24 hours, it ought not to be so.  It is a question whether it is advisable to carry out the scheme.  I understand that this is the only authority where there is anything like it.  At Northampton there was an old place at the back of their offices.  I know £30 is not much, but I would suggest the centre of the yard rather than the corner.  It is for the Council to say whether such a place is necessary.  If meat is not fit for food, the Inspector has only to say so.  He will not need 24 hours to get a magistrate to condemn it.  There is some neglect on somebody’s part if there is such a delay.  The £30 would not have to be repeated many times to swallow up a penny rate.

  Mr. Hornsby said that the sub-committee were unanimous in their recommendation.

  In reply to Mr. Wilmott, the Sanitary Inspector said that the present arrangements were wasteful of the men’s time.  He sometimes had to send a man down to the sewage farm with a small piece of diseased meat, whereas if they had proper storage he need not go until there was perhaps 2cwt. or more.  Sometimes he needed a cart to take away as much as 30cwt.

  Mr. Knight: It surprises me that there are no prosecutions.

  Mr. Piper: When people send for me, then it is not necessary to prosecute.  It would be different if they attempted to hide diseased meat or sell it.

  Mr. Wilmott: How often does it occur that you need a cart?

  Mr. Piper: I had one only last month.

  Mr. Corby: It must be taken somewhere, and the Sanitary Inspector and the Medical Officer say it should be taken to the depot.

  Mr. Perkins withdrew the original resolution and moved that a shed be provided.  This was seconded, and carried with three dissentients, Messrs. Bayes, Knight, and Horrell.

  Moved by Mr. Bates, and seconded by Mr. Hornsby, it was decided to adopt the first suggested scheme.

  Mr. Perkins then moved the remainder of the committee’s report, as follows:

SEWAGE FARM

  The Farm Sub-Committee reported that an offer of £5  5s. per ton had been received for the spare hay, about 5 tons, at the sewage farm.

  It was resolved to recommend the Council to accept same.

RATS AND MICE DESTRUCTION ACT, 1919

  The Clerk submitted a letter from the Clerk to the County Council, with reference to the Council’s refusal to accept delegation of that Council’s powers under the Act, stating that the majority of the local authorities in the county had concurred, and expressing the hope that this Council would reconsider their decision.

  The Clerk was instructed to reply that the Council saw no reason to alter their previous decision.

  The report was adopted.

  In another letter from the County Council the Rushden Council were notified that the County Agricultural Committee would no longer be responsible for the duties of the officer for rats and mice destruction, which duties would be delegated to the local authorities, with the consent of those authorities.

  The Clerk said that the consent of the Council must be obtained before the duties could be relegated to them.

  It was agreed not to go back on the previous decision.

“SOME MISAPPREHENSION”?

  The Council at a former meeting in committee having made certain recommendations of reductions in wages and salaries of workmen and staff, Mr. Knight said he believed there had been some misapprehension at the last meeting as to how much some of the officers were getting.  He wondered whether the matter could be dealt with in committee.

  The Chairman put the resolution about the wages of the caretaker and the road foreman, which was carried.

  Mr. Perkins said he rose to a point of order.  If they were going to refer any of the suggested reductions back, let it be all, and not deal with them piecemeal.

  Mr. Wilmott:  We had two hours of it the other night, and it is sure to come up again.

  Mr. Knight: I wish to move that the officers’ salaries be referred to the Council in committee.

  Mr. Corby seconded.

  Put to the vote, Mr. Knight, Mr. Corby and Mr. Horrell voted in favour, Messrs. Perkins, Coles, Bates, and Hornsby voted against, and the motion was lost.

  Mr. Swindall then moved the second part of the recommendation, that the salaries of the Clerk, Surveyor, Assistant Surveyor, Rates Clerk, and Collector be reduced to the amounts fixed by the Council in committee.

  This was seconded by Mr. Bates and carried.

  Mr. Knight: I move that the Clerk’s salary be not reduced.

  Mr. Wilmott seconded.

  The Chairman pointed out that that amendment could not now be put, as the resolution was carried.

  Mr. Swindall put the last part of the report, as follows:

  It was also resolved to recommend the Council that in the event of illness all, or any, of the whole-time officers’ salaries be reconsidered after an absence from office of 24 days.

  Mr. Perkins said he would second the proposition provided the words “during any twelve months” be added.  The 24 days need not necessarily be 24 consecutive days.

  Mr. Bates: I think you are drawing the line too close.  We want to be fair to everybody who works for the Council.

  Mr. Wilmott contended that it meant in one year.  If the number of days was insufficient that was another thing.

  Mr. Bates: We have never taken notice when members of our staff have been away for six weeks.

  Mr. Coles: It does not mean that action would follow.  It simply gives the Council power.

  Mr. Perkins: I don’t mind whether the period is made longer or not, but as it stands at present it might mean 24 days in 24 years.  I am not suggesting that you dock the man’s wages.  Be as generous as you like, but let us have a definite statement.

  Mr. Horrell seconded Mr. Perkins’s suggestion, and the resolution was carried with the additional words.

GAS EXAMINER

  The Clerk read a letter from the County Council stating that a county conference was to be held to consider the advisability of appointing a gas examiner for the district.  The Rushden Council were asked to send a representative to the conference.

  It was decided that the Chairman represent the Council.

NO SERIOUS DISTRESS?

  A letter was read from the Unemployment Grants Committee stating that as the Ministry of Labour was not prepared to certify the district of Rushden as distressed, they could not make a grant towards the cost of the suggested improvement of the Washbrook-road and High-street corner.

  The Clerk also read similar letters on the same subject from other official quarters, and added that the proposal had been “turned down all round.”

  The Chairman said he was very sorry to say that that appeared to be the end of that business.

INVITATION TO FOOTBALL MATCH

  Mr. J. George wrote inviting the Council to attend the benefit football match Ex-Servicemen v Old Players on Jan. 27th, and to tea at 5.15 in the B.W.T. Hall.

  Mr. Bates (rising to leave): Is there also to be a procession? (Laughter.)

  Mr. Horrell explained about the match.

  The Chairman said he was sure that as many as could get there would do so.

POSTAL IMPROVEMENTS

  The Postmaster-General wrote in reply to a letter from the Clerk requesting that increased postal facilities be arranged in the town, and stated that arrangements would be made to provide a sub-post office in the Newton-road district provided that a candidate and premises both suitable were available.  It was regretted that the reopening of the High-street South office could not be considered justifiable.

  The Chairman said it was almost certain that the action of the Council had had a good effect.  The 8 p.m. outward mail was a great convenience to the people of the town.

RAILWAY EXTENSION

  Mr. W. F. Corby, C.C., Clerk to the Raunds Urban District Council, wrote as follows:  “Dear Sir, - The Raunds Urban District Council has had before them the fact that various works of railway extension are being carried out in the country at the request of the Government, as one means of relieving the present serious unemployment that exists.  Such being the case, it has occurred to the members of this Council that the present would be a most opportune time to urge that the Midland Railway Company should extend their branch line from Wellingborough to Higham Ferrers on to Raunds.  It will be remembered that when the company obtained powers to construct this branch line they were authorised to continue the same to Raunds, but failed to exercise their powers any further than the borough of Higham Ferrers.  My Council have again brought the matter to the notice of the Ministry of Transport and the railway company, but so far without any apparent prospect of success.  It is felt that the extension of this branch line is a matter of interest to the surrounding neighbourhood, and I am instructed to ask that you will be good enough to bring the matter before your Council, with a view to their giving support to the application of this Council and urging that the authorities concerned should give the matter further consideration with a view to the continuance of the branch line to the extent to which they were enabled under their original powers.

  Mr. Swindall said that all who had the interests of the town of Rushden at heart would wish the scheme to be carried out.

  Mr. Horrell moved, and Mr. Wilmott seconded, that the Council approve the scheme and that copies of the resolution be sent to the necessary authorities.

  This was carried.

RUSHDEN’S DARK STREETS

  Mr. Hornsby called attention to the street lighting, and said that about 15 months ago, when the matter was before the Council, he understood that additional lamps were to be used for the present season.  There were still a number of streets that were very dark.  He suggested that the Lighting Committee consider the matter.  He was sure it would be appreciated by the inhabitants.  Could they not have all the lamps used now?  He knew there was the expense to consider.

  Mr. Wilmott said that the committee had unanimously decided to have all the lamps in the main roads into the town in use and to leave others for the time being.  It might cost £500 to fit new lamp heads and standards where necessary.  If the Council would give the committee instructions, they would try to get that done for another winter.  They had no lamp-heads in stock at present.

  The Chairman said it was too late to do anything for the present season.



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