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From two newsclips kindly loaned by his family
Mr. George Jolley
Veteran of Two Campaigns - Funeral of Rushden's Oldest Home Guard

George JolleyTHE OLDEST member of the Rushden Home Guard, in which he had served on the headquarters staff, 76-year-old Mr. George Jolley, of 68, Shirley-road, Rushden, was laid to rest at Rushden cemetery on Monday. Mr. Jolley, who was a lance-corporal in the Home Guard, passed away on Thursday after being bedridden for 12 weeks. He served in the Burma Campaign of 1889, in the South African War of 1900, and in the last war as sergeant-major of the Rushden V.T.C. Company.

He joined the Army "under age" when he was 19 years old, and after training in Ireland, went with the Devon Regt. to India, where he served about eight years, taking part in the Burma Campaign. He then left the Army and returned home, but when the Boer War broke out, being on the reserve, he was called to help his country again. This was not enough for Mr. Jolley, however, for when the campaign was over he joined the Rushden Volunteers (predecessors of the Territorials). He went through his two campaigns without being wounded, although he had many narrow escapes. He had three medals, among them the Burma Medal.

When the last war broke out, Mr. Jolley was over age, but he put his military experience to good use by training the Home Defence Volunteers. A native of Huntingdonshire, he came to Rushden after his period of regular service, and was employed in, the boot trade, working for Messrs. William Green and Son for 35 years, until he retired eight years ago. He started the first Girl Guide Company at St. Mary's Church and the Girls' Brigade at the Park-road Baptist Church. A widow, three daughters and one son are left.

A service at the house was conducted by the Rev N. P. Goldhawk, minister of the Park-road Methodist Church. At the cemetery an A.T.C. bugler, Cadet Britchford, sounded the Last Post and Reveille. The 8th Northampton Battn., Home Guard, was represented by Lt.-Col. V. H. Svkes, Capt. Pond (attached from the 4th Northamptonshire Battn.) and B.Q.M.S. C. Smith, and the following officers and men of B Company: Major A. D. Denton, Lt. W. F. Sargent, Lt. W. G. Lovell, C.S.M. H. Letts, D.C.M. H. E. Allen. Sergt. H. Underwood, Corpl. Warner, und ten other officers, N.C.Os. and men of B Company.

Mr. George Jolley, Rushden

A gallant and patriotic career closed on Thursday, January 28th, when Mr. George Jolley, of 63, Shirley-road, Rushden, died at the age of 76, after being confined to bed for 12 weeks.

Mr. Jolley was the oldest Rushden member of the Home Guard, serving at head quarters as a lance-corporal, and all ranks in the two Rushden Companies were proud of him. He served in the Burma campaign of 1889, in the South African War of 1900, and in the last war as sergeant-major of the Rushden V.T.C. Company.

George Jolley in uniformJoining the Army at the age of 19, Mr Jolley had training in Ireland and went with the Devon Regiment to India, where he served about eight years, taking part in the Burma campaign. He then left the Army, but when the Boer War broke out, being on the reserve list, he was called to help his country again. This was not enough for Mr. Jolley, however, for when the campaign was over he joined the Rushden Volunteers (predecessors to the Territorials).

When the last war broke out Mr. Jolley was over age, but he put his military experience to good use by training the Home Defence Volunteers. He went through all three campaigns without being wounded, although he had many narrow escapes. He had three medals, among them the Burma Medal.

A native of Huntingdonshire, he came to Rushden after his period of regular service and was employed in the boot trade, working for Messrs. William Green and Son for 35 years until he retired on pension eight years ago. He helped train the first Rushden Girl Guide Company (St. Mary's) and a Girls' Brigade Company in connection with the Park-road Baptist Church. A widow, three daughters and one son are left.

The burial took place at Rushden on Monday after the Rev. Norman P. Goldhawk, minister of the Park-road Methodist Church, had conducted a service at the house. At the cemetery an A.T.C. bugler, Cadet Britchford played the Last Post and Reveille. The 8th Northamptonshire Battalion, Home Guard, was represented by Lieut.-Col. V. H. Sykes, Capt. Pond (attached from the Northamptonshire Regulars) and R. Q.M.S. C. Smith, and the following officers and men of B. Company: Major A. D. Denton, Lieut. W. F. Sargent, Lieut W. G. Lovell, C.S.M. H. Letts. D.C.M. Sergt. H. E Allen, Sergt. H. Underwood, Corpl. Warner and ten other ranks.

The family mourners were: Mrs. G. Jolley (widow), Mr. F. G. Jolley (son), Mr. and Mrs. R. Brice, Mr. and Mrs. P. Dickens. Mr. and Mrs. G. Wilby (sons-in-law and daughters), Mrs. F. G. Jolley (daughter-in-law), Mrs. A. Rawlings (sister), Mrs. P. Lovell (sister-in-law), Mr. H. Auger (nephew) and Master D. Brice (grandson).

Wreaths bore the following inscriptions: From your loving wife Emma; In loving memory of my dear father, Ruby and Bent; In grateful remembrance of a good father, from Millie and Geo.; In memory of dear Dad. Fred and Freda; From your loving daughter Pat and Ray; In loving memory of dear Grampy, from your grandson Derek; From the Officers, N.C.Os and men of B. Coy. 8th N.N. Home Guard Battalion; From Joe and family, From neighbours in Shirley-road; Aunt Nell and family; From Emily, Harry and Maggie; Nieces and Nephews, 13, Moor-road; Pris and family.

Note: George Jolley died 28th January and was buried on 1st February 1943 in grave E1658 at Rushden Cemtetery.


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