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Photo courtesy Clive Wood
A.B. Edward William Chamberlain

R/398 Hawke Battalion Royal Naval Division

A.B. Edward W Chamberlain
A.B. Edward W Chamberlain
Son of Mr. Charles & Mrs. Caroline (now Mrs East)

Aged 20 years

Died 28th August 1918

Commemorated at Bagneux British Cemetery, Gezaincourt
Grave V. B.14
And in Rushden Cemetery
Grave B.695
The kerbstone in Rushden Cemetery
Born Rushden 14th Jan 1898. Worked as a plumber.
Army Reserve & Entered 25th Oct 1916; Draft for BEF 2nd Jan 1917, joined Hawke Bn. 26th Jan 1917-12th April 1917 Diarrhoea, rejoined Hawke Bn. 10th May 1917-19th May 1917 Pyrexia Unknown Origin, rejoined Hawke Bn. 5th Aug 1917-1st Nov 1917. Gassed, Invalided to UK 6th Nov 1917; Draft for BEF 17th May 1918, joined Hawke Bn. 27th May 1918-28th Aug 1918 DD. Toe right foot amputated.
Rushden Echo, 9th November 1917, transcribed by Kay Collins

GassedO.S. Chamberlain, Royal Naval Division, aged 18, son of the late Mr. C. Chamberlain, house decorator, of Rectory-road, is suffering from the effects of gas. He joined the Forces twelve months ago, and at the beginning of the present year he was sent to France.

Rushden Echo, August 23rd, 1918, transcribed by Greville Watson

Rushden’s Casualty List - Victims of the War

Mrs East, of Rectory-road, Rushden, has received nows that her son, A.B. Edward W. Chamberlain, R/398, R.N.D., has been taken into hospital, wounded in the head and very ill.  The Sister at the 29th Casualty Clearing Station, B.E.F., writes: “We are doing all we can for him.”  A.B. Chamberlain, who is 20 years of age, worked with his step-father in the firm of Messrs. Chamberlain and East, painters and plumbers, before joining the Forces.  In October last year he was gassed, and he returned to the Western Front four months ago.

Rushden Echo, August 30th, 1918

Rushden’s Casualty List - Victims of the War

In our last issue we reported that A.B. Edward W. Chamberlain, R/398, Royal Naval Division, son of Mrs East, of Rectory-road, Rushden, was wounded in the head and very ill.  It is now our painful duty to report that A.B. Chamberlain succumbed to his injuries on August 28th.  The grievous news is sent by the sister of the hospital, who writes under date August 28th, as follows:  “This brings you sad news of your son A.B. E.W. Chamberlain, R/398.  He was brought into our hospital badly wounded in the head and very ill indeed.  We did all we could for him, but he died soon after he came to us, on August 28th, quite quietly.  He was unconscious all the time he was with us.  With much sympathy.”  The Rev. A.C. Williman, C.F., writes as follows:  “It is with very deep regret that I write to inform you of the death of  your son, A.B. E.W. Chamberlain in hospital yesterday.  You will no doubt receive an official intimation later.  Every thing was done for him here that was possible, but his wounds were too serious for his recovery.  I can assure you of my deepest sympathy, and I sincerely pray God will sustain you in your sad bereavement.  Your son has made the great sacrifice, and his is the great reward.  May the God of all consolation comfort you with the thought of immortal hope.”  The official verification of the sad news is accompanied by the usual letter of sympathy from the King and Queen.  The late A.B. Chamberlain was 20 years of age, and had served nearly two years with the Colours, of which time he had spent a year and seven months in France.  Last October he was badly gassed and was sent home to England, returning to the Western front about four months ago.  Up to the time of joining the Colours he was a member of the firm of Messrs. Chamberlain and East, house decorators, etc.  As a lad he passed through Succoth Baptist Sunday school, and had a great many friends in Rushden and district who will deeply deplore his loss.  Mr and Mrs East and family desire to express sincere thanks for the many expressions of sympathy they have received in their sore bereavement.

Kettering Leader, 13th September 1918, transcribed by John Collins.

Struck in the Head - Rushden Plumber Dies of Wounds

A.B. Edward W. Chamberlain, R.N.D., eldest son of Mrs. East, of 14 Rectory-road, Rushden, was received in the 29th Casualty Clearing Station, France, on August 26th, with very severe wounds in the head, and passed away two days later without regaining consciousness. He joined the Forces two years ago and went to France on January 17th. He was a member of the firm of Messrs. Chamberlain and East, plumbers and decorators, Rushden.

Evening Telegraph, 5th September 1918, extracted by Pete Inns, transcribed by Kay Collins

Rushden Plumber Dies of Wounds

A.B. Edward W. Chamberlain, R.N.D., eldest son of Mrs. East, of 14 Rectory-road, Rushden, was received in the 29th Casualty Clearing Station, France, on August 26th, with very severe wounds in the head. He joined the Forces two years ago and went to France on January 17th. He was gassed in October last, and returned to the Western front four months ago. He is a member of the firm of Messrs. Chamberlain and East, plumbers and decorators, Rushden.

We regret that subsequent news has been received to the effect that Seaman Chamberlain died two days after admittance to the hospital. The chaplain wrote: “It is with the deepest regret I have to inform you of the death of your son, A.B. E. W. Chamberlain, in hospital yesterday. Everything was done for him here it was possible to do, but his wounds were too serious for his recovery”. The matron of the hospital also wrote: “This brings the sad news of your son’s death. He was brought into hospital badly wounded in the head, and very ill indeed. We did all we could for him, but he died soon after he came in, on the 28/8/19, quite quietly. He was unconscious all the time”. Mr. and Mrs. East and family wish to thank all friends for their kind messages of sympathy in the great loss they have sustained.


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