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Private W Nelson Lynn

13762 2nd Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment

Son of Mr William & Mrs Kate Lynn

Aged 19 years

Died 2nd April 1916

Commemorated at Lievin Communal Cemetery Extension
Grave IV. F.6.


Private W N Lynn
Born at Chelsea. Lived at Knuston, where his father was coachman to the Browning family.
The photograph comes from the Tom Woollard collection of pictures relating to Rushden House which became the Sanatorium. Tom was gardener to the Browning family.
The Rushden Echo, 14th April 1916, transcribed by Gill Hollis

Rushden Soldier Killed - Private Nelson Lynn
Shot by a Sniper - “A Good And Cheerful Soldier”

We regret to record that Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Lynn, formerly of Rushden House Cottage, and now residing at Brighton, have received the sad news, from unofficial sources, that their only son, Pte. Nelson Lynn, of the Northants Regiment, was killed in action on the Western front on Sunday, April 2nd. Mr. and Mrs. Lynn were notified of their son’s demise on Friday last, when they received two letters, one from their son’s N.C.O. and the other from his lieutenant.

Sergt. E. Smith wrote as follows:-

“I deeply regret to inform you that your son, No. 13762 Pte. Lynn, who was in my platoon, was killed in action about 5 o’clock this morning, April 2nd. I am sure both I and all his comrades send our deepest sympathy with you in this terrible loss. I must say he met his death in a most soldierly manner, as although mortally wounded he was joking with his comrades until he fell unconscious and died. He was sniped off by a German sniper whilst in the act of getting some wood to cook his breakfast; the bullet passed through his right shoulder and lodged in his spine. He lived for about five minutes after he fell. Believe me, I and all my platoon will mourn with you in the loss of a cheerful and good soldier.”

Lieut. F. C. Papworth wrote to Mrs. Lynn as follows:-

“It is my painful duty to tell you that your son has been killed in action. He was shot through the shoulder, the bullet passing into his brain, and I can assure you he suffered absolutely no pain whatever. Believe me, your son will be missed by both officers and men alike, and his place will be very difficult indeed to fill. A better soldier I have never seen or met, and it is very difficult for me to really express my feelings. He was always very willing indeed, and ever ready to lend a helping hand to his friends. I am sure you will find a great comfort in the fact that your son died for his country, and as only a good and brave Englishman can die. Once again let me assure you that you have my most heartfelt sympathy.”

The late Pte. Lynn, who was 19 years of age, enlisted on September 1st, 1914, and received his training at Weymouth, Penzance and Colchester. He was drafted to France on July 26th, 1915, and up to the time of his death, had participated in many engagements, but had come through unscathed. Prior to his enlistment, he was an employee of Mr. Joseph Knight, boot manufacturer, of Rushden.

Deceased’s father, Mr. William Lynn, has been for 22 years coachman to Mrs. E. C. Browning, of Hove, formerly of Rushden House.

Mr. and Mrs. Lynn desire to express thanks to the many kind friends who have expressed sympathy with them in their great sorrow and bereavement.


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