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Prisoners of War - WWI
Notes from the Newspapers
1918
Rushden Echo, 31st May 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

RUSHDEN PRISONERS OF WAR—To relatives of prisoners: A prisoner's first letter is not often written from a permanent camp. As soon as the settled camp is known his friends should communicate with one of the secretaries, Mr. C. L. Bradfield or Mr. Oliver Claridge.


Rushden Echo, 11th January 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Pte. Herbert John Groome of the R.A.M.C.
Mrs. Groome, of 50 Sartoris-road, Rushden, has received official news that her husband, Pte. Herbert John Groome, 72527 Royal Army Medical Corps, is posted as missing, and is believed to be a prisoner of war. Prior to enlisting – in October 1915 – he was in the employ of Mr. F. Corby, currier. Pte. Groome has been in France about 19 months, and was home on leave about three months ago. Mrs. Groome would be very grateful for any information which can be given to her as to the whereabouts of her husband.

Rushden Echo. 18th January 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoner of War—Mrs. Groome, of 50 Sartoris-road, Rushden, has now received news that her husband, Pte. Herbert John Groome, 72527 R.A.M.C., who had been reported missing, is now a war prisoner in Westphalia, Germany. He writes that he is in a working party, and that he is quite well.

Rushden Echo, 25th January 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Rushden Prisoner of War – News of Pte. William Tew – Now in Germany
Mrs. H. Clayton, of 28 Harborough-road, Rushden, has at last received a letter from her son, Pte. William Tew, who is a prisoner of war. His letter, which is dated December 15th 1917, is written from Bayreuth, and a couple of sentences have been effectively blacked out by the German censor. Pte. Tew says:-

“Dear Mother,—Just a line in answer to your most welcome letter, and to say how pleased I was with the parcels. I had only got half a pair of socks, so they came in just right, and the sweater I have to wear as a shirt, and the cardigan as a jacket, as I have had my khaki 15 months. It is so thin that it is dropping top pieces, and it is very cold here just now.

“Well, dear mother, no doubt you would laugh to see me with my wooden shoes on and driving a pair of cows and a wagon, just like those you see on the Palace pictures among the pine trees; in fact I have been chopping trees down the three weeks, besides working in the yard, as we are busy from five in the morning till seven at night. I am the only English-man in the place, so I find it very quiet. I have a smoke and then to bed. I am allowed one card a every week, and a letter every fortnight. The people I live with are all right with me. I am looking forward to seeing you all again soon. I hope you all have a merry Christmas. I think I shall have a better one than I had last year. I have just had a bit of goose, and we have just killed a pig, but there is no place like home.”

Rushden Echo, 1st February 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Rushden Prisoner of War
Telephonist Frank Tye in German Hands – Captured at Cambrai
Mrs. Frank Tye (nee Miss Kate Foster), who is residing with her husband’s parents at 17 Moor-road, Rushden, has received official news that her husband, Telephonist Frank Tye, of the R.G.A., is a prisoner of war in Germany, having been taken at Cambrai.

Telphonist Tye has two other brothers serving with the Colours, namely, Pte. Howard Tye, of the Leinster Regiment, who is in Palestine, and Lance-Corpl. R. Tye, of the Northants Regiment, who was seriously wounded at Aubers Ridge on May 9th 1915, and who is now stationed in Ireland. A sister, Miss Mabel Tye, has been on the nursing staff at Duston Hospital since the opening.

Telephonist Tye, who joined the Colours at Easter last year, formerly worked for Messrs. Lewis, boot manufacturers, of Northampton. Before leaving Rushden, nearly six years ago, he was employed by Messrs. John Cave & Sons Ltd. He was well known as a footballer, playing for Rushden Fosse.

Rushden Echo, 22nd February 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Casualties – Today’s Official Lists – Prisoners in German Hands [extract]
Rowney, 208831, J. H., Northants Regt.
Groome 72527 H. J., R.A.M.C.

The Rushden Echo, 12th April 1918, transcribed by Gill Hollis

Mrs. Freeman, of 65, Little-street, Rushden, has received indirect information that her husband, 13132 Pte. Herbert Freeman, Northants Regiment, is missing from his unit.  The news is sent by Pte. George Adams, in a letter to his parents who reside in Queen-street, Rushden.  Pte. Adams thinks that Pte. Freeman may be alive, but that he is probably a prisoner of war.  Pte. Freeman joined the Colours in September, 1914, and went to France in July, 1915.  He has twice been slightly wounded.  Before joining the Colours he was employed at the Express Boot Works, Irthlingborough.  His wife will be grateful to any of her husband’s comrades who can send her any further information.

April 26th 1918 Bandsman E B Smith
Rushden Echo, 26th April 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Rushden Casualty List
Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Gates, of 208, Wellingborough-road, Rushden, have received a postcard from their younger son, Pte. Herbert Thomas ("Bert") Gates, of the East Surreys, stating he is a prisoner of war. According to the postmark on the card, Pte. Gates was taken on March 25th, viz., on the third day after the opening of the great German offensive. Pte. Gates, who is but 19 years of age, joined the Colours in February, 1917, and went to France only in January last. His elder brother, Driver Arthur Gates, of the Royal Horse Artillery, is also serving his country on the Western front, having joined the Colours in November, 1914, immediately following the outbreak of war. He has been in France over three years, and has so far come through unscathed. Mr. and Mrs. Gates have been considerably relieved to receive news concerning their younger son, as six weeks had elapsed since they last received a letter from him.

Rushden Echo, 26th April 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Sgt. T. H. Newman, Northants Regt., of Sussex-place, Rushden, previously reported in the “Rushden Echo” as wounded and a prisoner of war has now been released from Germany and sent to Holland. He received 17 wounds about three years ago.

Rushden Echo, 26th April 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Rushden Casualty List
Mr. James Bunning, of 28, Robinson-road, Rushden, has received a card from his son, Pte. Sidney Bunning, Royal Fusiliers, to say that he is a prisoner of war in German hands. The postmark is Lemburg. Before enlisting, Pte. Bunning, who is 19 years of age, worked for Messrs. Selwood, The date of the card is March 28th. The day before the start of the German offensive, Pte. Bunning had written home to his parents, and since then they had heard nothing until the receipt of the card announcing his present whereabouts. Another son of Mr. James Bunning (Pte. C. H. Bunning) is presumed killed in the Battle of Loos, 1915.

Rushden Echo, 26th April 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Rushden Casualty List
Mrs. E. Martin, of 180, Wellingborough-road, Rushden, has received a postcard from her husband, Pte. Edward Martin, Royal Sussex Regiment, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. The card is dated March 31st. Pte. Martin enlisted on August 13th last year, and went to France on December 13th following. He was formerly employed by Mr. C. W. Horrell. Pte. Martin was well known as a footballer, playing for the Rushden Windmill Football Club. His mother has four other sons and three sons-in-law serving their country.

Rushden Echo, 26th April 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Rushden Casualty List
Mrs Stokes, of Rushden, has received a postcard from her husband, Lance-Corpl. Bert Stokes, of the Inniskilling Fusiliers, stating that he was taken a prisoner of war on March 22nd. The soldier says that he is unwounded, and mentions that Ptes. Norman Brittain (whose wife resides in High-street South) and Sam Smith (whose wife resides in Blinco-road) were taken at the same time. Lance-Corpl. Stokes joined the colours in November, 1916, and nine weeks later left for the Western front. He was formerly employed as a clicker at Messrs. Jas. Hyde, Ltd.

Rushden Echo, 26th April 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Rushden Casualty List
An official notification has been sent from the Infantry Record Office to Mrs. Watts, 8, Pemberton-street, Rushden, that her husband, 15136 Corpl. George Thomas Watts, Northants Regiment, has been missing since March 22nd. Mrs. Watts has also heard from two unofficial sources that her husband is a prisoner of war, one of her husband's comrades (Pte. Timpson of Rushden) having written to his wife that he saw Corpl. Watts taken. Corpl. Watts joined the Colours on the outbreak of war, and has been in France over three years, having been three times wounded. Up to the time of joining the Colours he was employed by the C.W.S. Boot Works, Rushden.

Rushden Echo, 26th April 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Rushden Casualty List
Mrs. Wilford, of 47 Glassbrook-road, Rushden, received an official notification on Tuesday morning that her husband, Pte. Ernest Richard Wilford, Beds Regiment, had been missing from his unit since March 24th. On Wednesday morning she received a postcard from the soldier himself stating that he is a prisoner of war and unwounded. Pte. Wilford, who was formerly employed at Messrs. Jaques and Clark's factory, Rushden, joined in July, 1917, and proceeded to the Western front on November 5th 1917. He had a month or two in hospital his year with trench fever, and went straight up the line from hospital on March 15th.

Rushden Echo, 3rd May 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Rushden Casualty List
A.B. J T RichardsonIn our last issue we published the news that A.B. John Thomas Richardson, of the Royal Naval Division, husband of Mrs Richardson, 41 Harborough-road, was officially reported missing. We are now pleased to report that Mrs Richardson has received a postcard from her husband stating that he is quite well and a prisoner of war in Germany. He writes under date March 29th: “I have been taken prisoner on the St. Quentin front at --- on March 24th, and am now on my way to a P.O.W. camp in Germany. As the English prisoners are being distributed to different camps, I cannot give you a definite address. Do not write until you receive further news, which will follow at first opportunity. I am quite well.” A.B. Richardson is a native of Raunds, but had resided in Rushden for about 20 years. He was one of the leaders of the Young men’s Bible Class at the Park-road Baptist Church, and also a local preacher, being always a welcome visitor to the Baptist Mission at Chelveston and Kimbolton, and also the Independent Wesleyan Chapel at Podington.

Last week Mrs Chas Elmer, of 20 Robert-street, Rushden, received an unofficial report that her husband, Lance-Corpl. Chas Elmer, Inniskilling Fusiliers, had been killed in action. Fortunately this information had no foundation in fact, as on Monday morning Mrs Elmer received an official report from the War Office that her husband is a prisoner of war in Germany. Lance-Corpl. Elmer, who was formerly employed by Messrs Knight and Lawrence, boot manufacturers, Rushden, joined the Colours twelve months ago last November, and went to the western front twelve months last January. In April last year he was in hospital for almost two months suffering from trench feet, and in July he was badly gassed, being totally blind for seven days. He was then in hospital until October and returned to the trenches at the beginning of November. He was home on leave in December last, returning to France on Boxing Day. He was well known as a footballer, playing for the Rushden Town Band Football Club.

Mrs Furness, of 21 Robert-street, Rushden, has received a card from her youngest son, Pte Henry Green, Royal Fusiliers, stating that he is wounded and a prisoner of war in Germany. Pte. Green, who is but 19 years of age, only went to France in January last. He was formerly employed at the Advance Boot Works, Rushden.

In our last issue we published the news that 40723, Pte. Arthur Norman Britten, Inniskilling Fusiliers, husband of Mrs Britten, of 86 High-street South, Rushden, and son of Mrs Arthur Britten, of 12 Windmill-road, Rushden, was reported a prisoner of war in Germany. His wife received official confirmation of the fact on Monday. Pte. Britten joined the Colours about 18 months ago, and went to France twelve months last January, having formerly worked at the C.W.S. Boot Works, Rushden. He has been twice wounded, and a brother of his, 15280, Corpl. C. H. Britten, Northants Regiment, has been a prisoner in Germany for about 2½ years, and is quite well.

Mr and Mrs J W Watson, of 155 Queen-street, Rushden, have received news from their third son, Pte. W. R. Watson, Northants Regiment, attached M.G.C., to say that he is a prisoner of war in Germany, and in good health.

Mrs. King, of 29, King’s-road, Rushden, has received official news that her son, Pte. Sydney King, 49026, Northants Regiment, was posted as missing on March 23rd.

Mr. and Mrs. S. Ashford, of 15, Wellingborough-road, Rushden, have received official news that their son, Pte. Richard Samuel Ashford, Northants Regiment, is missing.  He was 20 years of age.  Before joining the Colours he worked for the firm of Ashford & Campion (of which his brother is one of the principals), and subsequently he was in the employ of Messrs. Crick and Patenall.  He was sent out to France in February last year, and it is announced that he has been missing since March 25th.

Pte. George Henry Line, Northants Regt., son of Mrs Line, of 22 North-street, Rushden, has sent a postcard to his sister, Mrs Pettit, of 18 Woburn-place, Rushden, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany and unwounded. Pte. Line, who has been about 2½ years in France, has been twice wounded. Before joining the Colours, he worked for Messrs Robinson Brothers, boot manufacturers, Rushden.

Mrs H Parker, 13 Bedford-road, Rushden, has received a postcard from her husband, Lance-Corpl. Herbert Parker, Royal Irish Fusiliers, stating that he is a prisoner of war and unwounded. Lance-Corpl. Parker was called up as a reservist on the outbreak of war and has once been wounded. He fought throughout the Mons retreat, and has been right through the thick of all the fighting. He formerly worked for his uncle, Mr Joseph Knight, boot manufacturer, Rushden.

A fortnight ago we published the news that Mrs Parker, of 155 Cromwell-road, Rushden, had received official news that her husband, Pte Sydney Parker, of the Northants Regt. (son of Mr and Mrs G Parker, Montague-street, Rushden), was reported as wounded and missing from his unit as from April 22nd. At the same time we reported that there was some discrepancy as Mrs Parker had received a letter from her husband dated April 25th, in which he stated that he had become separated from his unit, but that he was quite well. Mrs Parker has now received a postcard from her husband, dated April 3rd, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany, and sound. Pte Sydney Parker joined the Colours two years ago last November, being one of Lieut. L Perkins’s recruits. He had been in France just over twelve months when taken prisoner, and was at home on leave last February. Before joining up he was employed by Mr B Ladds, boot manufacturer, Rushden, and was organist at the Rushden Wellingborough-road Wesleyan Reform Mission. He was also a member for years of the Rushden Adult School, officiating as pianist, and up to the time of his appointment as organist of the Wellingborough-road Mission he was deputy organist at the Rushden Congregational Church. Pte Sydney Parker has also a brother who is a prisoner of war, viz., Pte. Tom Parker (Northants Regiment), who was taken on April 17th, last year. Another brother, Pte. Geo. Parker, is in the Machine Gun Corps and in France.

We referred briefly to the fact in our last issue, the news having been obtained from unofficial sources, that Pte. Sam Smith, Inniskilling Fusiliers, husband of Mrs Smith, of 4 Blinco-road, Rushden, had been taken a prisoner of war. The news is now confirmed, as Mrs Smith has heard from her husband himself that he is in Germany, having been taken prisoner on March 21st. He writes that he is quite well and is in good spirits, and that his wife is not to worry in the least. He joined the Colours about two years ago, and had been in France altogether about 18 months. Messrs Nurrish and Pallett were his former employers, he having been with that firm for 18 years.

Rushden Echo, 3rd May 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Last week we reported that Mrs Watts, of 8 Pemberton-street, Rushden, had received official news that her husband, Corpl. George Thomas Watts, 15136 Northants Regiment, had been posted as missing since March 22nd. Mrs Watts has now received news that her husband is a prisoner of war and that he is wounded in the shoulder and right arm.

Mrs. Friend, Spencer-road, Rushden, has received official news that her husband, Pte. Arthur Robert Friend, 30915, Northants Regiment, was posted as missing on March 22nd.  As she had heard nothing of her husband for some time, Mrs. Friend wrote to the officer of that platoon, and received from Sergt. A. Magee the following letter: “In reference to your letter, I regret I have no further information of your husband.  He was last seen in a trench now held by the enemy, and is probably a prisoner of war, I am sorry to say, as he was one of my best men in No. 11 Platoon.  He was a good soldier and worker, and was liked by both officers and men, who wish me to convey their great sympathy.”  Before joining the Colours, in November 1916, Pte. Friend worked at Messrs. B. Denton & Son’s factory.  After two months’ training he was sent to France, and, after twelve months’ service, was home on leave (in January this year).  He is about 30 years of age.  Mrs. Friend would be glad if any of her husband’s comrades can give her any further information concerning his whereabouts.  Her address is No. 8, Spencer-road, Rushden, Northants.

  In our last issue we published the news that A.B. John Thomas Richardson, of the Royal Naval Division, husband of Mrs. Richardson, 41, Harborough-road, Rushden, was officially reported missing.  We are now pleased to report that Mrs. Richardson has received a postcard from her husband stating that he is quite well and a prisoner of war in Germany.  He writes under date March 29th: “I have been taken prisoner on the St. Quentin front at -----------on March 24th, and am now on my way to a P.O.W. camp in Germany.  As the English prisoners are being distributed to different camps, I cannot give you a definite address.  Do not write until you receive further news, which will follow at first opportunity.  I am quite well.”  A.B. Richardson is a native of Raunds, but had resided in Rushden for about 20 years.  He was one of the leaders of the Young Men’s Bible Class at the Park-road Baptist Church, and also a local preacher, being always a welcome visitor to the Baptist Missions at Chelveston and Kimbolton, and also the Independent Wesleyan Chapel at Podington.

Rushden Echo, 10th May, 1918, transcribed by Gill Hollis

Rushden’s Casualty List
  Mr. and Mrs. R. Allen, of 19, Grove-road, Rushden, have heard unofficially that their son, 13987, Pte. Herbert Allen, Northants Regiment, has been missing from his unit since April 20th.  The news is sent by a comrade, who writes that the platoon to which Pte. Allen belonged went too far, it is supposed, during an attack, and none returned.  Pte. Allen, who is 26 years of age, joined the Colours on September 1st, 1914, and has been in France altogether about three years.  On May 3rd last year he was buried by a shell and wounded in the shoulder, being subsequently brought to England suffering severely from shell-shock.  He returned to the Western front in February this year.  Before joining the Colours he was employed by Mr. C. W. Horrell, boot manufacturer, Rushden.  He is an enthusiastic footballer, and has put in a great deal of time at the sport since he has been in the Army.  Mr. and Mrs. Allen will be grateful for any further information any of their son’s comrades can send them.

Rushden Echo, 17th May, 1918, transcribed by Gill Hollis

Rushden’s Casualty List
Mr. and Mrs. H. Tomlin, of 25, Moor-road, Rushden, have received official news that their only son, 48621, Pte. Daniel William Tomlin, Royal Fusiliers, has been missing from his unit since April 5th.  Pte. Tomlin joined the Colours on February 12th, 1917, and first went to France on May 9th, last year.  He was home on leave recently, returning to France on February 12th last.  Pte. Tomlin, who is 20 years of age, has seen much fighting since he has been in France, but came through without a scratch right up to the day on which he is reported missing.  Before enlistment he was employed as a clicker by Messrs. Jaques and Son, Ltd., boot manufacturers, Rushden.  His name is on the Roll of Honour of the Rushden Wellingborough-road Mission, and as a lad he passed through that Sunday school.  Mr. and Mrs. Tomlin will be grateful for any further news concerning their son’s fate any of his comrades can send them.

  Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Allen, of 10, Brookfield-road, Rushden, received official news last Saturday that their fourth son, Lance-Corpl. Frank Allen, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has been missing from his regiment since April 4th.  Lance-Corpl. Allen joined His Majesty’s Forces immediately following the outbreak of war, and proceeded to the Western front on May 28th, 1915.  Up to the date on which he was reported missing he had come through all the fighting without injury.  He is 25 years of age, and up to the time of enlistment was engaged in clerical work for the British Thompson and Houston Co., Ltd., at Rugby.  Before leaving Rushden for his Rugby appointment he was in Mr. George Selwood’s office.  Mr. and Mrs. Allen have three more sons serving their country, viz., Pte. Arthur Allen, Northants Regiment, in Salonika; Mr. Horace Allen, who relinquished his student’s career at Ruskin College, Oxford, for service with the Friends’ Ambulance, and who is now stationed at York; and A. B. Cyril Allen, Royal Naval Division (formerly of the “Rushden Echo” staff), who is in France.

Rushden Echo, 24th May, 1918, transcribed by Gill Hollis

Rushden’s Casualty List
  Mrs. A. Friend, of 8, Spencer-road, Rushden, yesterday received a card from her husband, Pte. A. Friend, Northants Regiment, reported missing on March 22nd, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany.  He gives the gratifying news that he is quite well.

  Mr. and Mrs. George Wagstaff, of 142, High-street, Rushden, have received a postcard from their third son, Pte. Frederick Charles Wagstaff, of the Lincolns, to say that he is a prisoner in Germany, and sound.  Pte. Wagstaff had been missing from his unit since April 5th.  He is 19 years of age, and went to France on January 31st this year, having been with the Colours since twelve months last March.  Up to the time of enlistment he was employed by Messrs. Sanders & Sanders, boot manufacturers, Rushden.  For some time prior to joining the Colours he was a drummer in the bugle band of the Rushden Boy Scouts, and he was also a keen and enthusiastic footballer.  Mr. and Mrs. Wagstaff have yet another son serving his country, viz., Driver Ernest Wagstaff, of the R.F.A., who is in France, and the second son, the late Pte. Harry Wagstaff, Northants Regiment, gave his life in the service of his country on July 4th, 1916.

Company-Quarter-Master-Sergeant Jolley, of the Rushden Company Volunteers, and of 50, Robert-street, Rushden, whose son, Pte. Fred Jolley, of the Royal Sussex Regiment, had been reported missing as from March 28th as previously reported in the “Rushden Echo,” has now had a card from his son stating that he is a prisoner of war and wounded.  Pte. Fred Jolley, who is 22 years of age, joined the Colours two years ago this month, and went to France in the following August.  He has once previously been wounded, viz., in June last year, when he was sent to England with injuries to the face.  He returned to France last November.  Prior to joining the Army he was employed by Messrs. B. Denton and Sons, Ltd.

Lieut. George Bandey, M.G.C. (son of Mr. G. A. Bandey, proprietor of the Hinton Gorse Hotel, Woodford Halse, and formerly secretary of the Rushden Athletic Club), previously reported missing, now writes that he is a prisoner of war in Germany.  Before joining the Colours Lieut. Bandey was in the office at the C.W.S. factory at Rushden.

Mrs. Fairey, of 98, Harborough-road, Rushden, received a postcard on Wednesday from her husband, Pte. William Fairey, Somerset Light Infantry, to say he is a prisoner of war in Germany.  He says he is quite well, and asks his wife not to worry, as he is getting a pretty good living, adding that he is working eight hours a day.  Pte. Fairey, who is in Northern Germany, joined the Colours in August, 1916.  He went to France in March last, and the last letter his wife had received from him was dated March 22nd, about a fortnight after his arrival on the Western front.  It was on March 22nd that he was reported missing, and his wife and friends were naturally in a state of great anxiety until the receipt of the card on Wednesday.  As a lad Pte. Fairey went through the Baptist Sunday School, and is on the Roll of Honour connected with the Baptist Church.  Prior to enlisting he worked for the Tecnic Boot Co.

Rushden Echo, 24th May 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoner - Company-Quarter-Master-Sergeant Jolley of the Rushden Company Volunteers, and of 50 Robert-street, Rushden, who son, Pte. Fred Jolley, of the Royal Sussex Regiment, had been reported missing as from March 28th as previously reported in the “Rushden Echo,” has now had a card from his son stating that he is a prisoner of war and wounded. Pte. Fred Jolley, who is 22 years of age, joined the Colours two years ago this month, and went to France in the following August. He has once previously been wounded, viz., in June last year, when he was sent to England with injuries to the face. He returned to France last November. Prior to joining the Army he was employed by Messrs. B. Denton and Sons Ltd.

Rushden Echo, 24th May 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoner - A week or two ago we published the official news that 300642 Pte. James Rogers, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, had been missing from his regiment since March 21st. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Rogers, of 46 Irchester-road, Rushden, have now received a letter from their son, who is a prisoner of war. He writes under date March 30th: “All serene. Am sorry to have caused you such anxiety; expect you will have had a report ‘missing.’ I am now a prisoner of war, and we shall have to wait for the finish of the war before we can come together. I cannot give you an address yet as I have not got settled, and it will probably be some time before I can give you an address. I implore you not to worry. I am now finished with the fighting line. Will give you fuller account next time. Fondest love to all the family. All expect the war to finish shortly.”

Rushden Echo, 24th May 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoner - In our last issue we published the news that 48621 Pte. Daniel William Tomlin, of the Royal Fusiliers, son of Mr. and Mrs. H Tomlin, of 25 Moor-road, Rushden, had been missing from his unit since April 5th. On Wednesday morning Mr. and Mrs. Tomlin received a postcard from their son stating that he is wounded and a prisoner of war in Germany.

Rushden Echo, 31st May 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoner - In our last issue of May 17th we reported that Mr. and Mrs. Charles Allen, of 10 Brookfield-road, Rushden, had received official news that their fourth son, Lance-Corpl. Frank Allen, Oxon and Bucks L.I., was official reported missing. They have now received a card from him stating that he is a war prisoner in Germany and wounded in both legs, the right leg being fractured. Sergt. Allen says he can’t grumble, as he is having the same food as the Germans themselves. Mr. and Mrs. Allen have two other sons with the Forces, viz., Corpl. F. S. Allen, Northants Yeomanry, who is in Itlay, and Pte. E. J. Allen, K.R.R.’s, who is in France.

Rushden Echo, 31st May 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoner—Mr. and Mrs. William Thurlow, of 153 Cromwell-road, Rushden, have received a postcard from their son, Pte. George Thurlow, East Surrey regiment, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany and unwounded. Pte. Thurlow, who is 28 years of age, joined the Army two years ago last November, and has been in France two years. He was home on leave quite recently, returning to France on March 25th. Up to the time of enlistment he was in the employ of Messrs. John Cave and Sons Ltd., and was a member of the Rushden Rifle Band for two or three years. As a lad he passed through the Park-road Wesleyan Sunday School. Mr. and Mrs. Thurlow have lost one other son in the war, viz., the late Pte. Frank Thurlow, who was killed in action on May 14th 1915, as reported in the “Rushden Echo” at the time. Yet another son, Mr. Albert Thurlow, joined the Colours on Thursday.

Rushden Echo, 31st May 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Driver P. W. Long, R.F.A., who now a prisoner of war at Nesibin, Turkey, sends us a postcard, addressed "Rushden, Northants, England, near Heaven." He wishes the best of luck to the "Rushden Echo".

Rushden Echo, 7th June 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoner - Mrs. S. King, of 29 Kings-road, Rushden, has received a postcard from her husband, Pte. Sidney King, Northants Regt., stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany and quite well. It is about a month since we reported in the “Rushden Echo” that he had been missing from his unit since March 23rd. Pte. King, who joined the Colours on July 19th 1917, proceeded to France in January this year. He was well known throughout the county as a cricketer, having played for the Rushden Town First Eleven, and also for the county. An all-round sportsman, he was also an enthusiastic devotee of football, being a former member of the Rushden Windmill Football Club, and he is the holder of many trophies for running, his name having been prominent on local sports programmes. Since joining the Colours he put in some useful work at St. Albans for his regimental cricket club, when C Company of the 26th T.R.B. became champions by beating B Company and F Company, and in the final E Company by 18 runs in September 1917.

Rushden Echo, 7th June 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoner - C.Q.M.S. Geo. Jolley, of the Rushden Company Volunteers, and of 50 Robert Street, Rushden, has heard further from his son, Pte. F. G. Jolley (Royal Sussex Regt.), who is a prisoner of war in Germay. He writes: “I am getting on very well and you have no need to worry at all. I have lost my right arm, but I am getting well. I expect to be coming home soon, so cheer up. Everything is all right with me now.”

The Rushden Echo, 7th June, 1918, transcribed by Gill Hollis

Rushden’s Casualty List - Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Allen, of 86, Queen-street, Rushden, have, as reported in our last issue, received a postcard from their second son, Sergt. C. E. (Ted) Allen, of the Beds Regiment, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany and wounded in both legs, the right leg being fractured.  Sergt. Allen says he can’t grumble, as he is having the same food as the Germans themselves.  Mr. and Mrs. Allen have two other sons with the Forces, viz., Corpl. F. S. Allen, Northants Yeomanry, who is in Italy, and Pte. E. J. Allen, K.R.R.’s, who is in France.

Rushden Echo, 14th June 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Mr. and Mrs. George Denton, senr., of “Eastfields,” Rushden, whose twin sons, Lieuts. J. S. and W. H. Denton (Northants Regiment) we reported in our last issue as missing, have now received news that gives the impression that both are probably prisoners of war. The source of their information is a Rushden soldier who is home on leave, and who states that his battalion was adjacent to the missing brothers’ battalion, and that the last he noticed in making his own escape was that the Lieuts. Dentons’ battalion was surrounded, so that the twin cricketers are probably prisoners of war.

Rushden Echo, 14th June 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoner - Mrs. W. Chettle, of 49 Cromwell-road, Rushden, has received a postcard from her son, 203445 Pte. W. Chettle (Duke of Wellington Regiment), who has been missing since April 10th, stating that he is a prisoner of war in German and sound. This is the second son of Mrs. Chettle who is a prisoner of war, one other—Pte. Herbert Chettle, of the Northants Regiment—having been wounded and taken prisoner on July 10th 1917, at the Battle of the Dunes. Mrs. Chettle heard from him a fortnight ago, when he said that he was quite well and was being well treated. He added that he was going to have his photograph taken and would send his mother one. Yet another son is serving with the Colours, viz., Gunner Fredk. Chettle, who went to France last Sunday.

Rushden Echo, 14th June 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

About three months ago we reported the news that A.B. W. B. Hanger, of the Royal Naval Division, of 69 Spencer-road, Rushden, was reported missing from his unit as from March 24th. We are pleased to report that on Wednesday morning Mrs. Hanger received a postcard from her husband stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany, and sound. A.B. Hanger had been in France about six months when he was taken prisoner. Up to the time of enlistment he was employed by Messrs. W. Sargent & Co., Crabb-street, Rushden. He was well known throughout the county as a sportsman, usually acting as starter at most of the local sports organised on behalf of charity.

Rushden Echo, 14th June 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoner - Mrs. W. Ashford, of 58 Grove-road, Rushden, whose son, Pte. Richard Samuel Ashford, Northants Regiment, has been missing since March 25th, has now received from him a postcard, dated April 20th. The postmark is Stendal, so that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. He says he is quite well.

Rushden Echo, 14th June 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoner - Seaman Geo. Harold Cade, R.N.D., of Hood’s Battalion, formerly of Rushden, and afterwards of Kettering, reported missing in France since March 24th, now writes that he is a war prisoner in Germany.
Rushden Echo, June 14th, 1918, transcribed by Greville Watson

Rushden’s Casualty List - Men Killed, Wounded, and Gassed
Mrs W. Chettle, of 49, Cromwell-road, Rushden, has received a postcard from her son, 203445, Pte. W. Chettle (Duke of Wellington Regiment), who has been missing since April 10th, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany and sound.  This is the second son of Mrs Chettle who is a prisoner of war, one other – Pte. Herbert Chettle, of the Northants Regiment – having been wounded and taken prisoner on July 10th, 1917, at the Battle of the Dunes.  Mrs Chettle heard from him a fortnight ago, when he said that he was quite well and was being well treated.  He added that he was going to have his photograph taken and would send his mother one.  Yet another son is serving with the Colours, viz., Gunner Fredk. Chettle, who went to France last Sunday.
Kettering Leader, 21st June 1918
Prisoners
Pte H F Freeman Pte A R Friend Pte W Freeman
Pte H F Freeman, Northants Regiment
Pte A R Friend, Northants Regiment
Pte W Freeman,
Lancs Fusiliers

The Rushden Echo, 28th June, 1918, transcribed by Gill Hollis

Casualty List - About three months ago we reported the news that A.B. W. B. Hanger, of the Royal Naval Division, husband of Mrs. Hanger, of 69, Spencer-road, Rushden, was reported missing from his unit as from March 24th.  We are pleased to report that on Wednesday morning Mrs. Hanger received a postcard from her husband stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany, and sound.  A.B. Hanger had been in France about six months when he was taken prisoner.  Up to the time of enlistment he was employed by Messrs. W. Sargent & Co., Crabb-street, Rushden.  He was well known throughout the county as a sportsman, usually acting as starter at most of the local sports organised on behalf of charity.

  Mrs. W. Ashford, of 58, Grove-road, Rushden, whose son, Pte. Richard Samuel Ashford, Northants Regiment, has been missing since March 25th, has now received from him a postcard, dated April 20th.  The postmark is Stendal, so that he is a prisoner of war in Germany.  He says he is quite well.

  Seaman Geo. Harold Cade, R.N.D., of Hood’s Battalion, formerly of Rushden and afterwards of Kettering, reported missing in France since March 24th, now writes that he is a war prisoner in Germany.

Rushden Echo, 5th July 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

About six weeks ago we published the news that Pte. Herbert Joseph Leach (Rushden), of the Northants Regiment had been missing from his regiment as from April 5th. His mother (Mrs. Wm. Leach) who resides at 20 Bedford-road, Rushden, has now received two postcards from her son stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany and sound. Pte. Leach, who joined the Colours about 3½ years ago at the age of 20 years, went to France just over twelve months ago, and last November was invalided home with trench feet. He returned to France in February this year. Up to the time of enlistment he was employed by Mr. Geo. Warner, boot manufacturer, Rushden. Mrs. Leach has still another son serving his country in France, viz., Rifleman Percy Leach, of the K.R.R.’s. and she has also lost one son in the war, viz., the late Pte. Fred Leach, Northants Regiment, who was killed in action on September 26th 1915, at the age of 19 years.

Rushden Echo, 5th July 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

A month ago we reported that Lieuts. J. S. and W. H. Denton, the well-known twin County cricketers, and sons of Mr. and Mrs. G. Denton, senr., of Eastfields, Rushden, had been missing from their regiment (the Northants) since May 27th. We are now pleased to report that Mr. and Mrs. Denton received postcards dated June 1st from their sons on Wednesday morning stating that they are prisoners of war in Germany, and safe and well. This news will be received with marked gratification by the many friends of these well-known sportsmen throughout the country. They are 28 years of age, and joined the Colours nearly three years ago, being gazetted Second Lieutenants immediately on joining. About last July both were promoted First Lieutenants. Lieuts. J. S. and W. H. Denton were well-known throughout the country as County cricketers, playing for their own county. They were not only proficient, however, as “knights of the willow,” but were enthusiastic in all realms of sport, having been passionately fond of games from childhood upwards. Both were former members of the Rushden Fosse F.C., and during their scholastic career at Wellingborough Grammar School took a prominent part in all the school games and sports. At home they were actively associated with the Rushden Independent Wesleyan Church, being co-secretaries of the Sunday school. Up to the time of joining the Colours they were employed with their father in the firm of Messrs. B. Denton and Sons Ltd. Another of Mr. and Mrs. Denton’s sons, viz., the youngest, Lieut. A. D. Denton, of the Royal West Kents, lost a leg last July on the Western front, and although he has been home since last November, has not received his discharge. Yet another son, Driver H. G. Denton, pf the Motor Transport, A.S.C., has been in France since two years last January, and has, we are pleased to report, come through entirely unscathed. Mr. and Mrs. G. Denton, senr., and family desire to express their sincere thanks for the many inquiries they received during their period of suspense and anxiety.

Rushden Echo, 19th July 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Sergt. Joe Mitchell, of the Dunster Force writing from Mestopotamia to Mr. C. L. Bradfield, one of the secretaries of the Rushden Prisoners of War Fund, says: “I have just received a ‘Rushden Echo’ from my wife, and I see you have had a concert for the Rushden boys who have the misfortune to be prisoners of war. I should like to add something to the fund, so if you go or send round to my home, taking this letter, Mrs. Mitchell will give you £1 on my behalf. “ Sergt. Mitchell is the well-known boxer.

Sergt. A. Garley, 921 Rifle Brigade, who is now interned in Holland, writes to Mr. Bradfield as follows: “Thank you very much for the parcels I received whilst a prisoner. You may not often hear from those you send to, but I can assure you it is not their fault. The value of the parcels can never be estimated only by a hungry prisoner, and I wish you could only see the dejected look disappear as they are told ‘There is a parcel for you,’ when coming in at night to a dirty, comfortless room, tired, and many times bullied during the day, the thought of home and friends, and, better still, that they who have been captured whilst fighting hard are still remembered at home, and not only remembered but that the friends at home are doing all they can to ease our burden by sending help. I must say that the parcel from Rushden was most excellent one. I hope I shall soon have the pleasure of seeing you at Rushden.” Sergt. Garley encloses a card which was sent to him on his arrival in Holland at Christmas, 1917, by the King and Queen.

Rushden Echo, 26th July 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

News has been received by Mr. and Mrs. F. Atkins, of 3 Newton-road, Rushden, that 24909 Pte. G. Curtis, of the Yorks Regiment, is a prisoner of war in Germany. Pte. Curtis was formerly employed at Burton’s Stores, High-street, Rushden, during which time, he resided with Mr. and Mrs. Atkins. He was a keen footballer, and was a member of the Rushden Thursday Football Club. He writes under date June 3rd: “Just a few lines to let you know that I am still living. No doubt, you will be surprised to have this card. Hope you are keeping well at home. Pleased to say I am as well and as cheerful as possible. I have been a prisoner since April 9th. Hope to hear from you just to cheer me up. Keep smiling.”

Rushden Echo, 26th July, 1918

Rushden’s Casualty List - News has been received by Mr. and Mrs. F. Atkins, of 3, Newton-road, Rushden, that 24909, Pte. G. Curtis, of the Yorks Regiment, is a prisoner of war in Germany.  Pte. Curtis was formerly employed at Burton’s Stores, High-street, Rushden, during which time he resided with Mr. and Mrs. Atkins.  He was a keen footballer, and was a member of the Rushden Thursday Football Club.  He writes under date June 3rd: “Just a few lines to let you know that I am still living.  No doubt you will be surprised to have this card.  Hope you are keeping well at home.  Pleased to say I am as well and cheerful as possible.  I have been a prisoner since April 9th.  Hope to hear from you just to cheer me up.  Keep smiling.”

Rushden Echo, 2nd August 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoner - A month ago we published the news that Pte. Herbert Allen, of the Northants Regt., son of Mr. and Mrs. Rowlatt Allen, of 19, Grove-road, Rushden, was missing front his regiment. We are pleased to report that his parents have now received a postcard from him stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany and well. He asks his parents not to worry, but to look on the bright side. Pte. Allen joined the Colours immediately following the outbreak of war. He has been in France three years, and was wounded in May last year, subsequently coming home on sick leave, returning to the Western front in February this year. He was formerly employed by Mr. C. W. Horrell, boot manufacturer, Rushden.

Wm HootonRushden Echo, 2nd August 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoner - Rifleman William Hooton, of the King’s Royal Rifles, previously reported missing from March 21st, has written to his father, Mr. T. Hooton, of 4 Upper Queen-street, Rushden, to say that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. Rifleman Hooton joined the Northants regiment in March 1917. He was transferred to the King’s Royal Rifles, and went to France in February last. Previous to enlisting he worked for the Tecnic Boot Co.

Rushden Echo, 2nd August 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoner - Mrs. Taylor, of 99 Cromwell-road, Rushden, has received a letter from her brother, Pte. J. Clark, of the Royal Sussex Regiment (previously reported missing), containing the news that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. The letter which is dated June 2nd, did not reach Mrs. Taylor until yesterday morning, being thus two months on the way. After stating that he is in pretty fair health, Pte. Clark goes on to say: "We are still waiting for the war finish. We have heard that America has started fighting, but do not know whether it is right or not. I suppose they have reported me missing, but I am still alive and kicking. We are with all sorts of foreigners here; you would laugh to hear them talk. We are with Russians, Belgians, French, Italians, Scotch, Welsh, Irish, etc., and we all hope to get home this year." The rest of the letter is blacked out by the German censors.

Rushden Echo, 2nd August 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Rushden Prisoner of War - Seaman Stephen Langham “Well and Happy”

After prolonged anxiety, Mrs. S. Lanham, of York-road, Rushden, received by the second post today (Friday) the gratifying news that her husband, Seaman Stephen Langham, R.N.D., previously reported missing, is alive. In a letter, which was written three months ago, Seaman Langham says he is well and happy. It will be remembered by many, readers that some weeks ago a letter was received from Seaman W. B. Hanger, of Rushden, who was in the same battalion, and it was then hoped a letter would also be received from Mr. Lanham, but, as the days went by without news of any kind the anxiety regarding his fate became deeper. That anxiety has now bee dispelled by Mr. Langham’s communication that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. Mr. Langham is the well-know phrenologist.

Rushden Echo, 16th August 1918

Prisoner—In our issue of April 26th we reported that official news had been received by Mrs. Lambert, of 34, Irchester-road, Rushden, that her husband, Seaman Jim Lambert, of the Royal Naval Division, had been missing from his unit since March 24th.  Since that date no news had been received by Mrs. Lambert until Saturday last, when her tense anxiety was relieved by the glad news that her husband is alive and well.  In a letter which had taken no less a period than 14 weeks to reach her, Seaman Lambert gives his wife the news that he is a prisoner of war in Germany and that he is employed in a cobbling shop, mending boots.  Seaman Lambert, who was in the same battalion as Seamen Stephen Langham and W. B. Hanger, of Rushden (now prisoners of war in Germany), is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Lambert, of Grove-street, Higham Ferrers.  For five years prior to the time of his enlistment he was employed by Messrs. William Claridge and Sons, boot manufacturers, Rushden.  He went to France on December 18th last.

Rushden Echo, 16th August 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoner - Mrs. W. B. Hanger, of 69, Spencer-road, Rushden, has received a letter from her husband, A.B. W. B. Hanger, of the R.N.D., who, as previously reported in the "Rushden Echo," is a prisoner of war in Germany. In the letter, which was written on the back of a motor licence and enclosed in one of the old British green service envelopes, the interned seaman, in addition to asking for several necessities, states that he is doing a bit of work to while away the time.

Rushden Echo, 6th September 1918

Prisoners - Mrs. W. Bryant, of 51, Spencer-road, Rushden, has received a report from a soldier who is home on leave that her son, R/4093, A.B. Walter Bryant, R.N.D., has been wounded in the face and taken prisoner.  She has received no confirmation of this news from any other source, but as she has not heard from her boy for a fortnight she is naturally in much anxiety of mind, and will be grateful to any of her son’s comrades who can send her any definite news concerning him.  He is 19 years of age and joined the Colours in May, 1917, having been in France five months.

A.B. Stephen Langham, R.N.D., of York-road, Rushden, who, as we recently reported, is a prisoner of war, after being listed as missing for nearly five months, now writes to his wife that he is quite well and unwounded.  He says he is in a boot repairing and saddler’s shop, and adds that he is with A.B. James Lambert.  He is now at Parchim, in Germany.  Prior to writing the postcard which Mrs. Langham received a few weeks ago stating that he was a war prisoner, Mr. Langham had written saying he was a captive, but this card did not reach Mrs. Langham until some time after the other one.

Rushden Echo, 13th September 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoners-Mrs. P. Underwood, of 156 Wellingborough-road, Rushden, has received news from her youngest son, Pte. Jack West, of the Rifle Brigade, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. He writes: "I am still alive and kicking, and as well as can be expected. I got captured the first time up the line."€ He further regretfully states that a number of his comrades were "put out" on the same day, and adds that he longs for "dear old Blighty"€ again. He asks for some cigarettes, but does not mention food. He hopes that when he returns he will not be called upon to leave the doorstep of his home. Pte. West, as previously recorded in the "Rushden Echo,"€ was reported missing as from April 23rd this year, only three weeks after he went out to France. Up to the time of joining the Colours, at the age of 18 years, on September 11th 1917, he worked for Messrs. Jas. Hyde Ltd., boot manufacturers, Rushden, and for some years he was a drummer in the Rushden Church Lads' Brigade, being also a member of St. Mary's Bible class. It is somewhat of a coincidence that Pte. Peter Underwood (Pte. West's step-father) was taken prisoner by the Germans just twelve months previous to his stepson, viz., on April 17th 1917. Mrs. Underwood's eldest son, Drummer Walter West, Northants Regiment, is with his regiment in Egypt.

Rushden Echo, 13th September 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Missing - Mr. and Mrs. Groom, of 63 Midland-road, Rushden, have received news that their eldest son, Pte. William Horace Groom, of the Buffs, has been missing from his unit since August 6th. The news is sent by the Company Quartermaster-Sergeant, who writes to Mrs. Groom on behalf of the officer commanding. Stretcher-Bearer Harris, of Raunds, who has been gassed and is now in England, has however written home to his wife stating that if Pte. Groom had been killed or wounded, they would have found him when they searched the battlefield subsequent to the engagement. In the light of this information there is therefore reason to hope that Pte. Groom may be a prisoner of war. The missing soldier, who is 19 years of age, joined the Colours on Feb. 21st, last year, and went to France last Easter. He was formerly employed by Mr. W. L. Duncan, boot manufacturer, Rushden, and for a few months prior to joining the regular forces he was a member of the Rushden Company, 2nd. Battalion, Northants Volunteer Regiment. As a lad he passed through the Rushden Wellingborough-road Mission Sunday school.

Rushden Echo, 13th September 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Rushden Prisoners of War
Two More men Back in England – Privates F Jolley and H W Green

Quartermaster Sergt. and Mrs. G. Jolley of 50 Roberts-street, Rushden, have received a letter from their son, 5932 Pte. F. Jolley, Royal Sussex regiment, who has been a prisoner in Germany since March 27th, to say he has been repatriated, and, having arrived in England, is now in the King George Hospital in London. It will be remembered, as previously reported in the “Rushden Echo,” that when Pte. Jolley was taken prisoner, his right arm was badly injured, and subsequently it had to be amputated by the German surgeons.

Pte. Jolley writes: “I am getting about all right and in the best of health. . . . I can tell you it is a treat to be back in dear old England again. I don’t suppose I shall be in hospital long, as my arm is healed now, and it seems all right.

Pte. Jolley joined the Colours in May 1916, and went to Frances first in August the same year. He was wounded on June 6th last year and was sent home to England, returning to the Western front in November last.

Pte. Henry William Green, of the Royal Fusiliers, son of Mrs. Furniss, of 21 Roberts-street, Rushden, who, was taken prisoner on March 26th, has been repatriated and has arrived in England. In a letter to his sister dated Sept. 9th, he says: “Pleased to let you know that I am nicely fixed in England at last. We had a good reception on landing, and the docks were lined with thousands and it was grand to hear them cheer. As soon as we got on the train we were given a good feed, with cigarettes, beer, fruit and chocolate, so you can bet it made the boys smile. Expect that Mrs. Jolley has heard from “Tod” (Pte. Fred Jolley); we came over together. Am looking forward to having a good time now that I am here. I am going to a garden party tomorrow, so you see we have soon started to make up for our stay in Germany . . . . You need not worry about my wounds as they are getting on fine, but not healed up yet; also my leg is a bit short, but nothing to hurt much. Hope this finds you all in the best, as it leaves me A1, having just had a bottle of stout—the first since I was home.”

Pte. Green joined the army in February 1917, and proceeded to the Western front on January 8th this year, just after his 19th birthday. He formerly worked at the Advance Boot Works, Rushden. He is now in the 1st London General Hospital, Camberwell, London.

Rushden Echo, 20th September 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Rushden's Casualty List - In our last issue we reported that Pte. William Horace Groom, of the Buffs, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Groom, of 63, Midland-road, Rushden had been missing from his regiment since August 6th. We are pleased to report that Mr. and Mrs. Groom have now received a postcard from the British Red Cross Association, stating that the missing soldier is a prisoner of war in Germany and well.

Mr. and Mrs. F. Caswell, of 135, Wellingborough-road, Rushden, have been officially informed that their son R/1453, A.B. Reginald George Caswell, of the Royal Naval Division, was wounded on August 25th, and is now in hospital. Up to Tuesday Mr. and Mrs. Caswell had received no postcard............... [see Oct 6th 1918]

A former Rushden boot operative, Pte. F. G. Miles, aged 19, London Regiment, son of Mr. G. Miles, Gold-street, Wellingborough, reported missing on August 4th, is a prisoner of war in Germany.  The information has been received through the Red Cross Society.

A.B. William Burditt, R.N.D., son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Burditt, of High-street South, Rushden, was severely wounded in the right leg on September 2nd. Before joining the Colours Seaman Burditt, who is 19 years of age, worked for Messrs. W. Sargent and Co., Crabb-street. For five years he was a member of the 1st Rushden Troop of Boy Scouts, and he was one of those who guarded the telegraph lines on the Bedford-road after the outbreak of war. Mr. and Mrs. Burditt have one other son who is a prisoner of war, and a younger son joined the Colours a week or two ago on reaching the age of 18.
Rushden Echo, 27th September 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoner - About three weeks ago we published the news that Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Bryant, of 51, Spencer-road, Rushden, had heard unofficially that their son, B4093, A.B. Walter Bryant, R.N.D. had been taken prisoner. The news was conveyed to them by a Rushden comrade, Pte. Reginald Moore, who was then home on leave. Through our columns we then appealed to comrades of the missing soldier to send further news to the parents, and since then Mr. and Mrs. Bryant have received a letter from A.B. Buswell, of the same unit, confirming the news previously given. A.B. Buswell writes that he practically certain that A.B. Bryant was taken prisoner and that his wound was not serious, consisting merely of a graze on the right side of the face. On Tuesday Mr. and Mrs. Bryant received anm official report that their son was posted as wounded and missing on August 25th, so that in the light of the above-mentioned facts he is probably a prisoner of war. Formerly employed by Messrs Sanders and Sanders, boot manufacturers, Rushden, he joined the Colours in May 1917, and went to France on Easter Tuesday last, viz., seven weeks before his 19th birthday. A.B. Buswell in his letter also states that A.B. Caswell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Caswell, of High-street, Higham Ferrers, is also probably a prisoner.

Rushden Echo, 4th October 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoner - In our last issue we reported that B4093 A.B. Walter Bryant, R.N.D., son of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Bryant, of 51 Spencer-road, Rushden, was officially reported wounded and missing from his unit as from August 25th. We are pleased to report that Mr. and Mrs. Bryant have received a postcard from their son stating that he is wounded and a prisoner of war in Germany.

Rushden Echo, 4th October 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoner - Mr. F. Caswell, housepainter, etc., Wellingborough-road, Rushden, whose son A.B. Reginald Caswell, as reported a month ago in the "Rushden Echo," was listed as wounded and missing, have now received from him a card to say he is a prisoner of war in Germany, and suffering from wounds.

Prisoner - Mr. and Mrs. Groom, of 63 Midland-road, Rushden, whose son Pte. William Horace Groom, of the Buffs, has been missing from his regiment since Aug. 16th, have now received a postcard from him stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany and sound.

Rushden Echo, 18th October, 1918

Rushden’s Casualty List - Victims of The War
Mr. F. Caswell, housepainter, etc., Wellingborough-road, Rushden, whose son, A.B. Reginald Caswell, as reported a month ago in the “Rushden Echo,” was listed as wounded and missing, have notw received from him a card to say he is a prisoner of war in Germany, and suffering from wounds.

Mr. and Mrs. Groom, of 63, Midland-road, Rushden, whose son Pte. William Horace Groom, of the Buffs, has been missing from his regiment since August 16th, have now received a post card from his stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany and sound.

Rushden Echo, 25th October 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoners - Mrs. E. Martin, of 180, Wellingborough-road, Rushden, has received a postcard from her husband, Pte. Edward Martin, Royal Sussex Regiment, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. The card is dated March 31st. Pte. Martin enlisted on August 13th last year, and went to France on December 13th following. He was formerly employed by Mr. C. W. Horrell. Pte. Martin was well known as a footballer, playing for the Rushden Windmill Club. His mother has four other sons and three sons-in-law serving their country.

Mrs. Stokes, of 6 Fletcher-road, Rushden, has received a postcard from her husband, Lance-Corpl. Bert Stokes, of the Inniskilling Fusiliers, stating that he was taken a prisoner of war on March 22nd. The soldier says that he is unwounded, and mentions that Ptes. Norman Brittain (whose wife resides in High-street South), and Sam Smith (whose wife resides in Blinco-road) were taken at the same time. Lance-Corpl. Stokes joined the Colours in November 1916, and nine weeks later left for the Western front. He was formerly employed as a clicker at Messrs. Jas. Hyde Ltd.

An official notification has been sent from the Infantry Record Office to Mrs. Watts, 8 Pemberton-street, Rushden, that her husband, 15136 Corpl. George Thomas Watts, Northants Regiment, has been missing since March 22nd. Mrs. Watts has also heard from two unofficial sources that her husband is a prisoner of war, one of her husband’s comrades (Pte. Timpson, of Rushden) having written to his wife that he saw Corpl. Watts taken. Corpl. Watts joined the Colours on the outbreak of war, and has been in France over three years, having been three times wounded. Up to the time of joining the Colours he was employed by the C.W.S. Boot Works, Rushden.

Mrs. Wilford, of 47 Glassbrook-road, Rushden, received am official notification on Tuesday morning that her husband, Pte. Ernest Richard Wilford, Beds. Regiment, had been missing from his unit since March 24th. On Wednesday morning she received a postcard from the soldier himself stating that he is a prisoner of war and unwounded. Pte. Wilford, who was formerly employed at messrs. Jaques and Clark’s factory, Rushden, joined in July 1917, and proceeded to the western front on November 5th 1917. He had a month or two in hospital this year with trench fever, and went straight up the line from hospital on March 15th.

Mrs. Groome, of 50, Sartoris-road, Rushden, has received some welcome news, having had a postcard from her husband, 72627, Pte. Herbert John Groome, R.A.M.C., who has been a prisoner in Germany since November 30th last year, stating that he has been repatriated, and that he has arrived in England and is in King George’s Hospital, London. Pte. Groome enlisted on October 27th, 1915, and went to France in May, 1916. When taken prisoner he was sent to Westphalia, where he remained in hospital until he was subsequently transferred to a Prisoners of War Camp where, in his letters to his wife, he said he was getting on all right. Prior to enlistment Pte. Groome was employed by Mr. Fred Corby, currier, Rushden, and for some time was a cornet player in the Rushden Wellingborough-road Mission Band.

Rushden Echo, 25th October 1918, Transcribed By Kay Collins

Rushden Prisoners of War
A Hundred Men in The Hands of The Enemy
Over £2,000 Raised Locally Last Year

The annual meeting or the Rushden Prisoners of War Fund Committee and subscribers was held on Tuesday night in the Council Buildings. Mr. C. W. Horrell presided over a large attendance, supported by the joint hon. secretaries (Mr. C. L. Bradfield and Mr. Oliver Claridge).

Mr. Bradfield said there were 110 prisoners of war who were resident in Rushden at the time of their enlistment or when rejoining the Forces. Two of these had now been sent to Holland (Sergts. Garley and Newman), and two to Switzerland (Ptes. Ekins and Harris the latter having died on reaching that country). Two others (Ptes. Whitney and Freeman) had died as prisoners of war. Four had been repatriated, all more or less wounded and maimed (Sergt. Allen, Sergt. Green, Pte. Jolley, and Pte. Groome). That left exactly 100 prisoners of war belonging to Rushden, 55 being in the Northants Regiment, and the remaining 45 in 28 other units. [part of the report]

Rushden Echo, 1st November 1918

Rushden's Casualty List
  Mr. and Mrs. A. Rawlins, of 13, Moor-road, Rushden, have received a letter from Second-Lieut. A. Rodney, K.R.R., stating that their fourth son, 44790, Rifleman John Thomas Rawlins, has been missing from his unit since October 3rd.  The officer adds: “We have reason to believe that most of the men reported missing on that date are prisoners of war.  If at any time news comes through I shall at once inform you.  Your son was a splendid soldier and greatly liked by the men in his platoon.  I do hope news from Germany will soon come through and relieve you of the anxiety you must be caused.  Please accept my deepest sympathy.”  The missing soldier joined the Colours with Captain Stocken’s recruits when under 16 years of age, and was subsequently discharged on those grounds.  He again joined the Army on August 6th, 1917, and was sent to France in the Easter following.  He was at one time a member of the Rushden Wellingborough-road Mission Band, and was employed by Messrs. Sanders and Sanders, boot manufacturers, Rushden.  Mr. and Mrs. Rawlins have already lost one son in the war, viz., the late Lance-Corpl. William Rawlins, who died of wounds in France in August, 1916.  Another son, who has just turned 18, expects that he will shortly be called up.  Mr. Rawlins is collector for the Rushden branch of the Boot and Shoe Operatives’ Union, and his fellow-shopmates feel much sympathy with him in his present anxiety.

Rushden Echo, 8th November 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Rushden's Casualty List
Mrs. Maidwell, of 105, Portland-road, Rushden, has received information that Pte. James Lowe, Northants Regiment, whose home is at Shelton, Beds, and who prior to enlistment lodged with her, is a prisoner of war in Germany.  In a letter home Pte. Lowe says that he was wounded in the left thigh early on the morning of May 27th, and was subsequently captured by the Germans.  He adds that he was in a German hospital for five weeks, and was treated fairly well, but it is a life he does not care for and he will be glad when it is time for him to return home.  Pte. Lowe, who was formerly employed at the Co-operative Bakery, Rushden, joined the Colours in 1916.

Pte James LoweRushden Echo, 8th November 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Rushden's Casualty List

Pte. James Lowe, Northants regiment, formerly employed at the Co-operative bakery, Rushden, is (as reported in last week’s “Rushden Echo”) a prisoner of war in Germany. Pte. Lowe, whose home is at Shelton, in a letter to Mrs. Maidwell, of 105 Portland-road, Rushden, with whom he used to lodge, says that he is now employed by the Germans in seeing after horses which have been ill.

Rushden Echo, 15th November 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Prisoners - Pte. Thomas Wooding, Trench Mortar Battery, husband of Mrs. Wooding, of 53, Cromwell-road, Rushden, is unofficially reported missing. His Captain writes that it is probable that the missing soldier is a prisoner of war. Pte. Wooding joined the Colours in March, 1915, and went out to the Western front the same year. He was formerly employed by Messrs. Jaques and Clark. Rushden.

About six weeks ago we reported that A.B. Horace Edward Waller, R.N.D., son of Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Waller, of 7, Higham-road, Rushden, was missing from his unit as from September 30th. His parents have now received a postcard, under date October 4th, which states that A. B. Waller is a prisoner in Germany and sound. Seaman Waller, who is 20 years of age, joined the Colours in January, 1917, and went to France in July last year. Up to the time of enlistment he was in the employ of Mr. Lilley, currier, of Rushden.

H E Waller
Argus Newspaper
The Rushden Argus, November 15th 1918, transcribed by Susan Manton

Rushden Prisoner of War
Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Waller, of 7, Higham Road Rushden, received a postcard from the Red Cross Society on Sunday stating that their son A.B. Horace Edward Waller, of the R.N.D., is a prisoner of war in Germany. On Thursday morning Mr. and Mrs. Waller received a card, dated October 4th, from their son, stating that he was a prisoner and sound. The seaman was reported missing from September 30th. Seaman Waller, who is 20 years of age, was employed by Mr. Lilley, currier, Rushden before he joined up. He went to France in July last year

Rushden Echo, 29th November 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Rushden’s Casualty List
Mr Fred Bigley, Suffolks, of Moor-road, Rushden, has arrived home after being a prisoner of war in the hands of the Germans for eight months. He had been badly wounded about 18 months ago, and after several months’ hospital treatment he was sent back to France last April, when the German advance had well begun. He was taken prisoner almost as soon as he got into action. While in enemy hands, he was forced to assist, later on, in the German evacuation of Lille. Although he was badly treated by the Germans, he hopes soon to feel little the worse for it.

Pte Raymond Hodge, who before joining the Forces was in charge of Mr H P Hodge’s shop at Rushden, and who was taken prisoner about last May, has now been liberated, and is in England.

Good news has been received by Mr Harry Willis, of 35, Victoria-road, Rushden, concerning his eldest son, Pte Wm Willis, Northants Regiment. As we reported in our issue of October 11th, Mr Willis had received a letter from a Higham Ferrers soldier to the effect that Pte Willis had been killed in action. We are glad to state that Mr Willis has now received a letter from his son stating that he is a prisoner of war. Pte Willis has seen four years’ service in France, and he has been four times wounded. He is well known in Rushden as a footballer, having played for the Rushden Church Institute Football Club.

Rushden Echo, 29th November 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

HOME FROM GERMANY - Sergt. Garley, Higham-road, Rushden, arrived home last Sunday, after three-and-a-half years as a prisoner of war in Germany. He says he cannot speak too highly of the kindness of the friends who were responsible for sending parcels out to him and to thousands of others in the same plight. He said it was that alone which saved them from utter starvation. Had the German authorities allowed the parcels to be delivered in the state in which they were sent, things would have been better still. Eatables, especially bread, from home were always broken into tiny pieces by the censorship authorities in Germany. He also speaks of the excellent comradeship between all prisoners of war, whether British, French, Russian, or oven blacks. He says that that prevented many from collapsing after the reserve strength, for want of food, had gone. Sergt. Garley looks well and feels well, but he says it will take some time to regain his normal strength. He has the congratulations of all his friends in getting back safely.

Rushden Echo, 29th November 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Worked at Krupps - After four months' captivity in Germany, Leading Seaman S. Robinson, R.N.D., of Portland-road, Rushden, has returned home. While in enemy hands he was forced to work at Krupp's Munition Works, at Essen. After the signing of the Armistice he was sent to Holland. He is a partner of the Allen Boot Co., Rushden.

Pte H T GatesRushden Echo, 6th December 1918, transcribed by Nicky Bates

Victims of the War
Pte H T Gates, 8th East Surreys, younger son of Mr and Mrs H S Gates, of Wellingborough-road, Rushden, arrived home last week from Alsace-Lorraine, where he had been in captivity since March 23rd, this year. He was in the 18th Division, the name of which will be known for generations to come for the splendid way in which they carried out their order received on the third day of the retirement to "hold on to the last man, and not to give way on any account." The terrible sacrifice made by the 18th Division enabled the artillery to get back to safety. Pte Gates was taken prisoner with a few others who were not killed. For three days, with no food at all, he was compelled to assist in carrying German and British wounded (on poles and ground sheets) to Metz. Arriving there, all the prisoners were stripped of anything which the Germans wanted, such as field dressings, articles of rubber, printed matter, etc., and were then made to load shells. From that time they were given to divide between 20 men a loaf of German black "bread," a sample of which he brought home. It is hard and very heavy, the colour of earth, and obviously contains a lot of saw-dust. As a change from loading shells the prisoners were compelled to work on constructing railways and roads for the German advance to Paris, working from early morning till dark on one slice of "bread" only.

The Germans told our men that they would be in Paris within a few days, but the accounts given by later prisoners revealed the fact that the German plans had gone wrong. When our men asked for more food the German would reply: "You cannot have more food until your Navy raises the blockade". Even the German soldiers have to send some of their coarse rations home to keep relatives from hunger. Pte Gates says that even the day before the Armistice, Alsatians and Austrians deserted from the German army, threw down their arms, and wore the revolutionist colours. He was one of about 500 who started to march to the French lines, over 100 of whom perished on the journey, which took three days, and it was only the thought of freedom and home that sustained the remainder. Pte Gates is rapidly recovering from the effects of his unenviable adventures.

Rushden Echo, 13th December 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Organist’s Return from GermanyPte. Sid Parker, Northants Regiment, son of Mr. George Parker, Montague-street, Rushden, who was taken prisoner last March, has arrived home safely. He was in hospital a good part of the time he was in enemy hands. He has brought home some very interesting souvenirs from Germany, including ornamental specimens of huge tobacco pipes, coins, etc. He is organist at the Wellingborough-road Mission Hall.

Rushden Echo, 13th December 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Rushden Prisoner of War
We are pleased to state that Seaman John Thos. Richardson, Howe Batt., R.N.D., has arrived home from Germany, where he had been a prisoner of war since March 24th.—three days after the German offensive. He is the husband of Mrs Richardson, of 41, Harborough-road, Rushden. He states that the work he had to do in German coal mines was excessively hard, especially on the poor rations allowed—only two slices of black “saw dust” bread and soup of doubtful origin to help it down. Once his party, unable to work any longer on such food, went on strike. A German Socialist came and addressed them and advised them to try and stick it as it would not be for much longer. They were given a herring for each man per day for that week. Mr Richardson on two occasions was under a fairly decent German foreman, who got him transferred to an easier job. He was also comparatively fortunate in getting clothes and keeping—until the last—a pair of good boots. A packet of Woodbine cigarettes could often be exchanged for a pound of sugar, and anything made of leather, or articles such as soap or candles could be exchanged for money or things 20 times their English value. The German civilians, Mr Richardson says, were almost starved by the British Naval Blockade. Boots and clothing, etc., had to be made of paper and other substitutes. Big retailers had to close up most of their premises for want of commodities for sale, the few articles offered being of poor quality. Mr Richardson was working at a hospital when news came through of the Armistice. He was released the following week and went to Holland in a train which conveyed over 1,000 other prisoners. The reception by the Dutch was, he says, magnificent.

Pte F J Burgess
Rushden Echo, 13th December 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

War prisoner in a Mine
A Plucky Rushden Soldier – On Strike for Better Food
A gallant attempt to escape from a German prison was made last August by Pte. George H Line, 7th Northants, son of Mrs Line, of 22 North-street, Rushden. Pte. Line has arrived home with a number of others, and is fortunately getting over the worst effects of his terrible time in Germany. After nearly three years’ hared fighting, he was captured last March in a village near Amiens, a number of Germans with revolvers surrounding his little party, who were doing stretcher bearing. He was sent back behind the lines and compelled to work until his health broke down. He was then sent to hospital, and after recovering, was made to work in a coal mine, being “housed” in a camp at Munster. As the food was very poor in quality and insufficient in quantity (black bread and vile soup) he – with others – refused to work down the mine and as a punishment he was made to stand along a wall for a whole work shift (eight hours) with just trousers, shirt, and clogs, and if they moved three inches or looked around they were struck by the sentries with their rifles. Even when he was made to do any work, Pte. Line always endeavoured to do more mischief than good, as he and his pals would not if they could help it, do anything to assist the enemy and so prolong the war.

One particular galling experience was the harsh treatment meted out to all the British in that camp by a British company-sergeant-major. It appears that the C.S.M. tried to curry favour with the Germans by treating the British Tommies worse than the Germans had treated them. During the time that C.S.M. was placed in charge of the British soldiers, he had a blanket taken from each man. (They had previously had two per man.) He was also continually putting the men in “clink,” and otherwise inflicting suffering on them. After this C.S.M. had gone and a German placed in charge the men were much better treated again. Pte. Line, getting so thoroughly fed up with the hardship, resolved to try and escape. He and a pal, being on night duty, escaped in the dark and set off, with a fair amount of provisions which had been sent in parcels from home. They tramped for five days, and got within 14 miles of the Dutch frontier when his pal, thoroughly exhausted, fell ill with pneumonia. Pte. Line carried his friend to a farmhouse close by, the two thus being forced to give themselves up. That was the fourth attempt made by Pte. Line’s friend. They were taken back to Munster, and Pte. Line never saw his again. He himself was punished by solitary confinement in a dark cell, with nothing but black bread and water, for 14 days.

“After that” he says, “I have never done a stroke of work for the Germans.” He spoke feelingly of his appreciation of the kindness of the people at home in sending parcels of food out to help them. He says 50 per cent of the men must have died but for that food. He had had often to exist on grass until he got parcels from home, which began to arrive four months after he was captured.

Rushden Echo, 13th December 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Rushden Seaman reaches Home
A.B. S Langham’s Experiences as a Prisoner of War
Able Seaman Stephen Langham, Hood Battalion, Royal Naval Division, of York-road, Rushden, the well-known phrenologist, who was taken prisoner by the Germans on March 24th, reached home on Saturday evening last, and, considering the experiences through which he has passed, is looking wonderfully well. Interviewed by a “Rushden Echo” representative he said:-

Seaman Stephen Langham
Seaman Stephen Langham
"At 2.30a.m. on March 24th our Commanding Officer sent word that we were to retire, and we all collected in the main trench for that purpose. Then came the order to go back to our positions and hold the ground at all costs, so we went to the front line. About 4a.m. there was a thick fog on the ground about a yard high, and there is no doubt this fog saved our lives. We could not see the German front line trenches because of the fog, nor could they see us. We were firing at the support trenches. We could see the enemy coming up in very large numbers. When the fog lifted we were surrounded by machine guns; the enemy gave us the chance to throw down our kit and surrender, and this our officer ordered us to do, as there was no help for it.
"The enemy opposed to us were Saxons and they treated us in a very soldier-like way. No British soldiers could have treated us better. After that, however, we fared worse. We had to march 17 miles without food, and at night slept upon the frosty ground, with nothing to keep us warm but the barbed wire, and no roof but the sky. Next day we had to march to another camp, and from Saturday to Monday at 2p.m. we had not a bite of food. At night there was only one hut for about 2,000 of us, and we all had to go to sleep standing up, and packed in tightly. We were there four day, and were served with dry bread for breakfast and with ''€vegetable soup''€ for dinner. I was then marched to a central camp, where the Germans collected the prisoners and sorted out the men who were wanted for work. James Lambert, of Rushden, and myself were picked out as boot makers. We were not fortunate in the German corporal who was over us, and I think it was his fault that our letters home were not despatched, so that our friends were so long in suspense. We had six months of this work, and when the Germans had to retire because of the advance of the Allies we were sent back too. I was released on November 14th and was taken to a fortress at Huy, in Belgium, where the Belgians showed us every possible kindness. I am now on eight weeks' leave.

“In some of the camps the Germans treated the prisoners most brutally, but we were not so badly off as that, though we were served with sour and mouldy bread; the “coffee” was made with some sort of burnt grain; and our dinner consisted chiefly of cabbages, and sometimes a little meal; what meat we had was horseflesh, varied with putrid fish, and the jam at times was putrid. We had to work ten hours a day, and many of the prisoners were stricken down with dysentery.”

Rushden Echo, 13th December 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

War prisoners who have arrived home include Seaman James Lambert, of Rushden (son of the late Mr Joseph Lambert, of Higham Ferrers).

Rushden Echo, 20th December 1918, transcribed by Kay Collins

Rifleman Wm. Hooton, King's Royal Rifles, son of Mr. and the late Mrs. Hooton of 4, Queen's-terrace, has been admitted to Higham V.A.D. Hospital from Germany. He joined the Army in February, 1917, and went to France in February of this year. After a month's fighting he was wounded in the hand and leg and was captured by the enemy at the beginning of the March offensive. He had to inform his friends that he was at Friedrieschfeld, but most of the time, even though wounded, he was at work behind the German lines. He was given such rough field dressings, as the Germans had - paper bandages, etc. - the food was almost uneatable, and it was five months before parcels began to arrive from home. Meantime he had been sent to Krupps' Works at Essen. All the time his wounds, for want of attention, were getting worse. When he got released and was able to get proper medical attention in England, he was only just in time to avoid septic poisoning. He is now making good progress.

Rushden Echo, 14th February 1919, transcribed by Kay Collins

German DeceptionLance-Corpl. H. Stokes, Rushden, of the Inniskilling Fusiliers, home on leave from Cassel Prison Camp, Germany, gives an instance of German duplicity. He says a party of war prisoners were photographed, most of the men holding large bowls of steaming contents, and in front was big “Dixie” of apparently hot food. This was sent to England and was published by various newspapers, giving a misleading idea of the treatment accorded to our men. The Dixie and bowls contained little but hot water!



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